Posts in Category: Broadcast History

February 25, 1950…”Your Show Of Shows” Debuts On NBC!

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February 25, 1950…”Your Show Of Shows” Debuts On NBC!

“YSOS” debuted as part of a two and a half hour block that was called “Saturday Night Review.” The first hour, was “The Jack Carter Show,” live from WMAQ in Chicago and was a comedy and variety affair airing at 8 Eastern.

At 9, ninety minutes of fun on YSOS hit the air and was followed at 10:30 by “Your Hit Parade”. Jack Carter’s show was replaced the next year by “The All Star Review.” This two and a half hour block was the first time Pat Weaver’s “participating sponsor” plan was used, which gave us the now famous phrase; “Brought to you in part by _____,”

The show debuted from NBC’s first theater converted to television, The International at 5 Columbus Circle. YSOS was actually a carryover from a 1949 show that had been so popular, it was canceled!?!? What? It’s true!

“The Admiral Broadway Revue” was the start of one of television’s greatest early comedy teams…Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca, with the great Max Liebman producing. The show had great ratings but unbelievably, Admiral (who “owned” the show) ended it in May of ’49. It seems that the show generated sales of Admiral TV sets that were far beyond their capacity to manufacture them. Admiral had to either end the show or build a new plant.

Since they owned the show, it could not continue with another sponsor and they would not sell it. Such were the sponsorship problems of the early days of television. Soon after this, NBC Vice President Pat Weaver would solve this problem by having the network own the shows and sell spots to sponsors. He is the man that brought magazine style ad sales to radio and television, which spread the cost of production among several advertisers.

On February 25, 1950, four of The International’s brightest years started with the debut of “Your Show Of Shows,” Caesar and Coca were back with a cast of writers that have become the “who’s who” of comedy including Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner and more.

Below are a few classics clips from “Your Show Of Shows” with Carl Reiner and Howard Morris in with Sid and Imogene. The first is The Haircuts song parody sketch, followed by their parody of “From Here To Eternity” called, “From Here To Obscurity” in two parts. As the story goes, when Sid is doused with buckets of water in the Obscurity sketch, the crew and writers lined up off camera for their turn to throw water in the bosses face! Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=He4S5UdQ76Y “So Rare”

http://youtu.be/5RQRhtKpbsE “Obscurity Part 1”

http://youtu.be/Yk0-Y1rCwZU “Obscurity Part 2”


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February 25, 1928…Television’s “First License” Issued: Sort Of

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February 25, 1928…Television’s “First License” Issued: Sort Of…

Charles Francis Jenkins invented a mechanical television system called “radiovision” and transmitted the earliest moving silhouette images on June 14, 1925.

At the time, there was no Federal Communications Commission, or even it’s forerunner, the Federal Radio Commission, so Jenkins applied to the Department Of Commerce for a six month experimental license in July of 1926.

By 1927, the FRC had been established and the first experimental TV license they issued was to GE’s W2XB in Schenectady on January 13, 1928. Shortly after, Jenkins applied for another experimental license and it was issued February 25, 1928.

In a nut shell, Jenkins had the second experimental license from the FRC, but the first government granted experimental television license. Below is a photo of Jenkins televising his “Shadowgraphs” presentation at his Washington DC offices.

The reason he chose silhouettes was because resolution was so low, that was about the only detail you could see on the tiny inch and a half screen. There’s more on this fascinating inventor at the link below. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.tvquarterly.com/tvq_35_2/articles/Radio%20Finds%20Its%20Eyes.pdf


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February 25, 1945…Johnny Olson’s First Television Job?

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February 25, 1945…Johnny Olson’s First Television Job?

In this rare newspaper ad from Maureen Carney, a mystery blooms on the 70th anniversary of a local television version of the Blue Network’s “Ladies Be Seated” radio program.

In 1944, Olson became the host of the ABC Blue Network’s “Ladies Be Seated”, afternoon radio game show. That was his first New York radio job. As for his television carrier, most sources site his first TV job as the announcer of “Name That Tune” in 1958.

In 1943, NBC had divested itself of the Blue Network and it was now owned by Richard J. Nobles, who also owned the Life Savers Candy Company. WRGB was the GE owned television station in Schenectady, New York and it seems that for a number of Sunday nights, the had Olsen come up and host a local version.

Our friend Randy West wrote a book on Johnny and hopefully when this post reaches him in California, he’ll have something to add. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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TeleTales #90…The Real Beauty Of The RCA TK30

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TeleTales #90…The Real Beauty Of The RCA TK30

Notice the lighting in this 1948 photo from WDAF in Kansas City. When the TK30, the first Image Orthicon camera debuted in 1946, it brought with it several new advantages. One of which was the ability to shoot with 10X less light than the Iconoscope cameras.

With only 250 foot-candles, vs 2,500, studios would be a lot cooler. The IO image was a lot sharper too and for the first time, television cameras had a turret of lenses that allowed each camera to give four different views of each single scene, depending on which of the four lenses was chosen.

The TK30’s, chrome trimmed sister was the TK10 which, except for the decorative chassis with a red stripe at the top and a glossy paint job, was exactly the same camera, yet the TK30 was deemed a “Field” camera while the TK10 was designated a “Studio” camera. The reason for this was that the TK30 could operate in the filed with less power, but could also be operated in the studio with a TK10 power supply. Even the viewfinders were interchangeable.

I never understood why RCA never made a movable viewfinder hood for the TK30, where they needed it most. The TK10’s hood was movable, but would not fit on the TK30. Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee


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TeleTales #90…Living On Tulsa Time: KOTV

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TeleTales #90…Living On Tulsa Time: KOTV

In October of 1949, KOTV became Oklahoma’s second television station and claimed to have the largest studios in the US, which were built in a former Intentional Harvester dealership.

This photo from 1952 shows that, even though they didn’t have pedestals for their RCA TK30s, they did have the brand new RCA Electra Zoom lens, which debuted with the “Today” show at NBC.
Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee


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TeleTales #89…The Early Days Of WMAR, Baltimore

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TeleTales #89…The Early Days Of WMAR, Baltimore

These are the new WMAR mobile units in 1948, shortly after they became the third CBS Television affiliate. Up till then, CBS only had WCBS in New York and WCAU in Philadelphia. By comparison, NBC had at least six affiliates, and by the end of the year would have eleven.

WMAR was the eleventh licensed station in the country, and went on the air in ’47. They spent a year as an independent station because at the time, they did not know if they would be included in the Washington DC metro area or if Baltimore would become it’s own metro market. In early ’48 the FCC declared Baltimore a separate market area. The vans and TK30s are from RCA. Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee


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TeleTales #88…You Know What They Say About Necessity!

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TeleTales #88…You Know What They Say About Necessity!

It is indeed the mother of invention. When you need a crane, but can’t get one to you location, build one out of wood. I have no idea where,or what is shoot is, but offer a tip of the hat to an innovative crew. “Get ‘er done!”. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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I Love Lucy At The Sixth Annual Emmy Awards

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By Request: First Emmy Kinescope Footage…’I Love Lucy’ Win

At about a minute in, you’ll see two KHJ TK10s dip on their pan to avoid bumping lenses as Vivian Vance passes between them on the way to receive her Emmy as Best Supporting Actress.

Presenting the award is Richard Denning, Lucy’s old radio costar of ‘My Favorite Husband’.

This is February 11, 1954 at the Hollywood Palladium with Ed Sullivan (not shown) as MC of the Sixth Annual Emmy Awards. Lucy and Desi also win for Best Situation Comedy, but due to theirs, and Vance’s comments about the absence of an award for writers, that category was added the very next year. Thier award is presented by Preston Foster who was with Lucy in her first screen test at RKO.

The Seventh Annual Emmy Awards show in 1955 would be the first nationally televised program. It would air on NBC with Steve Allen as host, but that I know of, there is no footage of that…only an audio track. Thanks to David Breneman for the request. Enjoy! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.yourememberthat.com/media/10359/I_Love_Lucy_At_The_Sixth_Annual_Emmy_Awards/#.VOxIgvnF-Sp

I Love Lucy At The Sixth Annual Emmy Awards

I Love Lucy At The 6th Annual Emmy Awards! In these excerpts from the earliest existing Emmy Awards telecast, Vivian Vance accepts the Emmy for Best Series Supporting Actress (from none other than Lucy’s former radio co-star Richard Denning) and then Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz accept the Emmy award…
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TeleTales #86…The First Televised Oscars And “Gown Trip”

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TeleTales #86…The First Televised Oscars And “Gown Trip”

The 25th Academy Awards ceremony was held on March 19, 1953. It took place at the RKO Pantages Theater in Hollywood and at the NBC International Theater in New York. It was the first Academy Awards ceremony to be televised, and the first ceremony to be held in Hollywood and New York City simultaneously. The New York ceremonies were held in NBC’s International Theater, which was then home to “Your Show Of Shows.”

In the short clip below, we see Shirley Booth accepting the best actress award for “Come Back Little Sheba” at the International with cuts back and forth from Hollywood. There’s a quick glimpse of one of the cameras as she exits the stage. Her ascent to the stage is without a doubt the first televised “gown trip.” She is a true pioneer!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcBMpusmlkw

Ronald Colman presenting Shirley Booth with the Oscar® for Best Actress for her performance in “Come Back, Little Sheba” at the 25th Academy Awards® in 1953….
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TeleTales #85…Where Was The Oscars Orchestra?

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TeleTales #85…Where Was The Oscars Orchestra? Here!

As you’ll see, the orchastra was actually in Studio A at Capitol Records and not the Dolby Theater. The move from the pit to the studio is not a new thing and has been going on for years with all of the big awards shows. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

#t=49″ target=”_blank”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZBjtg_adeM #t=49

Take a look behind the scenes at the Oscars Orchestra.
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TeleTales #84…Tore Livia’s Fantastic Single Steadicam Shot

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TeleTales #84…Tore Livia’s Fantastic Single Steadicam Shot

As I mentioned in today’s first post, Tore was the man that shot last year’s incredible Tony Awards opening with host Hugh Jackman hopping all over Radio City Music Hall. Here it is again. Tore picks up the shot outside and holds it flawlessly for 4 minutes that took them all over the building. You can see Tore in the elevator with Jackman and Neil Patrick Harris at around 2:20.

Last night’s Oscars show didn’t offer the same challenges, but in a world of robocams, it’s nice to see and salute great camera work like this. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKTlTsQgy5w

Hugh Jackman, a practitioner of Transcendental Meditation, hopping at Tony Awards Opening 2014. Hugh and the David Lynch Foundation http://www.tm.org/blog/pe…
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Oscars 2015: Peeking at preparations for the big day

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TeleTales # 83…Oscars Rehearsal Photo Spread

Here are a couple of dozen shots from the Los Angeles Times at rehearsals with a couple of nice shots of our friend Tore Livia, one of two Steadicam operators on stage last night.

At last year’s Tony Awards, Tore shot the whole Hugh Jackman jumping jack routine while walking backward for three minutes through Radio City Music Hall. Be sure and turn on the captions tab at the bottom left of the pages to see what’s what. Enjoy! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/oscars/la-et-mn-oscars-academy-awards-preperations-red-carpet-photos-20150220-photogallery.html

Oscars 2015: Peeking at preparations for the big day

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ENVELOPE OSCARS Oscars 2015: Peeking at preparations for the big day Caption Inside the show Al Seib / Los Angeles Times Steadicam operator David Eastwood cruises across the stage during Wednesday rehearsals in the Dolby Theatre. Steadicam operator David Eastwood cruises across…
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Time-lapse…Building The Oscars Red Carpet Area

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Time-lapse…Building The Oscars Red Carpet Area[fb_vid id=”10152667232022061″]WATCH: Time-lapse captures crews building Oscars’ red carpet.
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Just For Fun…The Music Of “My Fair Lady”

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Just For Fun…The Music Of “My Fair Lady”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PsXXtgrfOv8
For a Sunday morning treat, I was looking for something with as much class, sentiment and quality as Charles Osgood brings our way on “CBS Sunday Morning”. I hope you will agree that this comes pretty close.

As sung by Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn, here is the original soundtrack with such amazing classics as “I Could Have Danced All Night”, “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly”, “On The Street Where You Live” and more.

Below is Audrey on the flower market set with director George Cukor. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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TeleTales #80…A Trip Down Memory Lane With Dumont

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TeleTales #80…A Trip Down Memory Lane With Dumont

Here’s a fun collection of intros from The Dumont Network shows of the late 1940s and early ’50s. Scattered among the intros are a few commercials; one with Johnny Olsen for Red Goose Shoes. If you forgot about Kaiser – Frazier cars, there’s a spot here for them too. There are some nice surprises along the way including the final clip of one of television’s first ever game show stars, Dennis James. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZ2jiujfguA

Opening intros for several DuMont Television Network series of the 1950s. These clips were sourced from various places and as such the picture quality of som…
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February 22, 1980…The Miracle On Ice Game; USA Beats USSR

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February 22, 1980…The Miracle On Ice Game; USA Beats USSR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYscemhnf88
At the link is the final minute of the historic Olympic hockey game played 35 years ago today. The Russians were veterans and by all measures, the best team in the world, but somehow a bunch of American college kids beat them, and the crowd went wild…from sea to shining sea. Thanks to Kevin Vahey for the images and reminder! Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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Making The Oscars At R.S. Owens & Company In Chicago

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Making The Oscars At R.S. Owens & Company In Chicago

In case you missed it, here’s ABC’s story on how the Oscar statues are made. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/oscar-statues-made-america-29092613Best supporting role goes to the American Worker for their attention to detail and quality workmanship.
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TeleTales #79…”The Rope” From Alfred Hitchcock, 1948

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TeleTales #79…”The Rope” From Alfred Hitchcock, 1948

There are only 10 edits in this unusual film which was shot in scenes that lasted from 4 minutes to over 10 minutes. In order for the huge Technicolor camera to follow the action, set wall were suspended on rails so walls could open to let the camera pass through. Below left is Jimmy Stewart with Hitchcock just in front of him, but notice the gap above the camera where the set walls have opened for it to pass. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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TeleTales #77…Giants Of The Silver Screen

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TeleTales #77…Giants Of The Silver Screen

Just for fun, Rock Hudson and Jane Wyman on the miniature set of “All That Heaven Allows”. A well done mini set is almost impossible to tell from the real thing sometime. The 007 film series is full of them. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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TeleTales #77…Hereeeeeeeeeeees Johnny!

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TeleTales #77…Hereeeeeeeeeeees Johnny!

Just for fun, here’s The Great Carsoni on a unique set of water skis at Cypress Gardens, Florida from a 1968 special. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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One Of TV’s Most Memorable Moments…Clarabell’s Goodbye

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One Of TV’s Most Memorable Moments…Clarabell’s Goodbye

Until those awful days in Dallas in 1963, September 24, 1960 was television’s most memorable moment…at least for us kids who watched ‘Howdy Doody’ every Saturday morning.

Although the show went color on September 12, 1955 from Studio 3K, this is the only color footage of the show I have ever seen. For many years, this tape was lost but was finally found and restored.

The final episode was a special hour long show and in this ultra rare clip, we see the beginning and end, and even hear audio from the control room crew at the very top as they prepared for Episode 2,343…the grand finale. Notice on the ending promos, ‘The Sheri Lewis Show’ was the replacement for Howdy.

Lou Anderson, the third and final actor to play Clarabell, has a surprise for us, and that was the episode title…”Clarabell’s Big Surprise”.

Just as I remember where I was on November 23, 1963, I remember this. I was 10 years old, laying on the couch in our Atlanta home, still dressed in my pajamas. When Clarabell spoke, there was tear in my eye. Some good friends were gone.

What about you? Where were you and how did you feel that morning?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJ6ybvlsb4s

Broadcasted on September 24, 1960. The hour-long episode was mostly a fond look-back at all the highlights of the show’s past, but in the midst of it all, Cl…
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Rare Classic! Ed Sullivan Taping Holiday On Ice With TK41s

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Rare Classic! Ed Sullivan Taping Holiday On Ice With TK41s

Here is some great home movie footage of the taping at Madison Square Gardens in 1967. This link is to the air version of the show so you can see how it came out. #t=94″ target=”_blank”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjSsctTLovY #t=94

I notice Producer Bob Precht and Floor Manager Eddie Brinkmann are wearing different clothes in later shots, but I think this was all shot in one day. They may have changed after rehearsal and cut ins when an audience was brought in. I understand part of the budget included spiked golf shoes for the crew so they could walk on the ice without slipping.

Although the RCA TK41s have CBS Color logos, they are not from a CBS mobile unit, as there were no CBS owned color mobile units before the Norelco cameras came along. The cameras are most likely from a truck rented from either WOR or Video Tape Center.

I see Director Tim Kiley at the front (blue shirt white pants) of this and I think I see AD John Moffitt too. Producer Bob Precht is the tall blond man (red shirt blue pants). At around 4:20, there is a very familiar looking man in glasses. Do you know who that is? I think he is a comedian, but I can’t call his name. Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afvi0gitInQ

Holiday On Ice 1967 (U. S. A)….At Madison Square Garden for afternoon taping for The Ed Sullivan Show….cameos of Lighting Director Don Watson, Company Ma…
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The Debut Of “Playhouse 90″…October 4, 1956

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The Debut Of “Playhouse 90″…October 4, 1956

This is how television’s most distinguished anthology series started. Although the weekly 90 minute series only ran for four years, it is still held as the gold standard for live television drama.

Jack Palance is the host of this debut show, but the next week, he would star in “Requiem For A Heavyweight” which won Emmys for Best Director (Ralph Nelson) and Best Teleplay (Rod Serling) as well as a Peabody Award.

This debut broadcast was done from Studio 31 at CBS Television City and was directed by the renown John Frankenheimer. The script written by Rod Serling was an adaptation of the book by Pat Frank. To relieve the pressure of producing four 90 minute live shows a month, every third week a filmed episode was aired.

In the comments section, I have included a page of this first script that was used by John Frankenheimer. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHPdXQwRnoc

Director: John Frankenheimer ***** Stars: Charlton Heston, Vincent Price ,Richard Joy — Playhouse 90 is an American television anthology series that aired …
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ULTRA RARE! First Ever Look At NBC Studios 6A And 6B

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ULTRA RARE! First Ever Look At NBC Studios 6A And 6B

When RCA and NBC moved into 30 Rockefeller Plaza in November of 1933, the sixth and 7th floor studio space was left unfinished and sat empty for almost exactly eight years as managers tried to gauge television’s progress.

If TV progressed rapidly, they would build television studios there, but if it lagged, they would build radio studios. With the advent of WW II, television went on the back burner, so they built radio studios, but…with television in mind.

There is no known first date use, but in this rare “RCA Review” article from 1942, we now know that the studios went into service in early November of 1941. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-RCA-Review/RCA-Review-1942-Jan.pdf

www.americanradiohistory.com

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The First Television Show From NBC Studio 6B…

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The First Television Show From NBC Studio 6B…

A couple of weeks back, I showed you a rare, pristine photo of the “Texaco Star Theater” which was the first television show to come from Studio 6B. That was the first and only photo I had ever seen, but Val Ginter sent me the image of the show. The quality is not as good, but it’s still historic and shows Milton Berle on stage in a turban.

Studio 6B and Berle debuted the same night…June 8, 1948. When the show stared, Berle was hosting the radio version and his television debut was only a trial run as he had not yet been named the permanent host. NBC gave comedian Jack Carter a one month trial as host too in August. By the end of the month, the choice was clear and Berle took over in September.

Up next, a very rare history of Studios 6A and 6B! Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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A Fuller History Of NBC Television News…Some New Surprises!

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A Fuller History Of NBC Television News…Some New Surprises!

After further research, I now realize that last week’s story on this subject only scratched the surface or a much deeper history. Today, we set the record straight.

The most widely celebrated dates in NBC news history are February 16, 1948 and February 16, 1949. In ’48 “The Camel Newsreel Theater” debuted as a 10 minute weekday newsreel from Fox Movietone News which was narrated off camera by John Cameron Swayze.

The next year, Swayze moved in front of the camera and that began “The Camel News Caravan” as a live news show. CBS had put Douglas Edwards on camera May 3, 1948.

BUT…this was not the start of news at NBC. In fact, almost immediately after their first regular TV service began April 30, 1939, news had begun to be reported on W2XBS (WNBT).

Newscaster Lowell Thomas had occasionally simulcast his NBC Radio show locally from Studio 3H as early as December 1939 and from February till July of 1940, he regularly simulcast his “Sunoco News” show to New York viewers.

There was also the weekly “Esso Television Reporter” from March until May of 1940 hosted by William Spargrove, who narrated off camera. The Esso program used live organ music and on camera was a mix of newswire photos, maps and graphic miniature depictions of news event locations.

In the photo below, we see one of those Esso mini sets in use. This scene depicts the first use of aircraft to attack warships. Remember, although WW II had not come to our shores yet, Europe was fully engulfed in 1940. As we will see, the war severely curtailed television in every way, but there is more to the pre war story below.

From July of 1941 till May of 1942, Sam Cuff hosted a weekly news commentary called “Face The War”, but the show ended as RCA and NBC cut television operations down to next to nothing five months after Pearl Harbor.

On February 23, 1944, things started to stir a bit as “The War As It Happens” came to television, and NBC News has been on the air more-or-less continuously since then.

“The War As It Happens” began as a local program, but NBC records indicate that in April of 1944, it was fed to Schenectady and Philadelphia on the fledgling NBC Television Network and became the first news cast regularly seen in multiple cities.

At the time, even the great NBC Radio news department was tiny compared to the wire services and newspapers and newsreels. Television was even less able to gather news because they didn’t even have local film crews. The first breakthrough came in 1944 when John Royal, the first head of television at NBC, acquired the rights to Army Signal Corps film.

Using this footage, “The War As It Happens” followed what was basically a newsreel format, using the film with Paul Alley narrating and Ray Forrest in the studio with commentary, maps and wire photos.

In August 1945, the war was over and the Sunday “The War As It Happens” newscast was renamed “The NBC Television Newsreel”.

In mid 1946, it gained a sponsor and became “The Esso Newsreel” and was rescheduled to two nights a week, Monday and Thursday.

On February 16, 1948 Esso bowed out and a new sponsor came to the show which became “The Camel Newsreel Theater”. The next year, it went live with Swayze on camera, but surprisingly there are reports of background music throughout the broadcast until the early 1950s. That was a remnant of the old newsreel shows. In 1956, Swayze was replaced by Chet Huntley and David Brinkley. I think you know the rest of the story. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee


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President’s Day Special…First Live Presidential News Conference

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President’s Day Special…First Live Presidential News Conference

January 25, 1961, President Kennedy held the first ever live presidential news conference. It originated from the auditorium of the State Department and was carried live on both radio and television. It was the first of sixty three he would give.

Prior to this, live radio broadcasts by a President were scripted speeches. In press conferences prior to Kennedy, questions were submitted in advance and were not asked by reporters nor broadcast live, but were recorded on film for television and on audio tape for radio news.

Instead of presenting the historical footage, I’ve included a short compilation that reminds us of JFK’s easy style in these press conferences. He was the first American president to really understand television and how to use it to his advantage, which started during the campaign. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXDLLUOxmsY

The wit and humor of President John F. Kennedy is revealed in this series of clips from his various press conferences.
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President’s Day Special…First President On Color Television On May 22, 1958,…

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President’s Day Special…First President On Color Television

On May 22, 1958, President Eisenhower was the first President to be broadcast in color from the new WRC TV facilities in Washington.

If you go to 14:02 on the video, Bob Sarnoff will list some interesting Presidential media firsts before changing the black and white broadcast to color with the touch of a button.

This is an amazing video from the start too! NBC’s David Brinkley is the narrator for the TV audience of the dedication and there are plenty of shots of the studio with the new RCA TK41s in service. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.veoh.com/watch/v191020606nr3MbJGOn May 22, 1958, Pres. Eisenhower became the first president to be recorded in color on videotape as he helped dedicate NBC’s brand-new 4001 Nebraska Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. facilities (which housed network and WRC Radio/WRC-TV studios)in a live afternoon broadcast fed to the NBC Television n…
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President’s Day Special…First President, Coast To Coast

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President’s Day Special…First President, Coast To Coast

Not only is President Truman the first President to be broadcast cost to coast, he was the first person to do this! The first coast to coast broadcast, September 4, 1951 was made by President Harry Truman who made the principal speech at the Japanese Peace Treaty Conference in San Francisco. The video is below.

AT&T was close to inaugurating their new cross country coaxial and microwave relay, but when it was announced that Truman would be the attending instead of his Secretary of State, AT&T pushed hard to get it finished and did, just in time. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

#52919436” target=”_blank”>http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly-news/52919436 #52919436Video on msnbc.com: The first coast to coast broadcast, September 4, 1951 was made by President Harry Truman who made the principal speech at the Japanese Peace Treaty Conference in San Francisco.
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President’s Day Special…First President On Television, FDR

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President’s Day Special…First President On Television, FDR

Franklin Roosevelt was the first American President to appear on television at the dedication ceremonies of the New York World’s Fair on April 30, 1939.

When Roosevelt made history he was watched by a couple of hundred viewers in the RCA pavilion as well as a few dozen more back at the NBC in Manhattan. More people likely saw FDR live at the fair than in front of TV sets.

RCA president David Sarnoff actually beat FDR on TV by ten days as he dedicated the RCA Pavilion. Enjoy and share!




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