Posts in Category: Broadcast History

TeleTales 26…The Gray Research Sound Effects Console

TeleTales 26…The Gray Research Sound Effects Console

This is kind of a followup to posts earlier in the week that showed portable turntables from the 1930s, This was the big boy unit and CBS had a lot of these in their radio studios across the country. RCA had a similar model.

These were originally used for sound effects playbacks, but some of the first disc jockey shows were done on these machines as well. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales 25…My How Thing$ Have Changed

TeleTales 25…My How Thing$ Have Changed

As you look at these numbers, consider this. What cost $100,000 in 1975 dollars now costs $440,030. If you remember from a few days back, “Miami Vice” cost almost $1.3 million per episode when it debuted in 1984. Anyone have a chart like this for today’s shows? Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales 24…Just For Fun!

TeleTales 24…Just For Fun!

Here’s great shot of Mitch Miller dropping his pants as part of a practical joke during rehearsal at NBC Brooklyn Studio 2. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

January 23, 1975…”Barney Miller” Debuts On ABC


January 23, 1975…”Barney Miller” Debuts On ABC

The series was born out of an unsold television pilot, “The Life and Times of Captain Barney Miller”, that aired on August 22, 1974 as part of an ABC summer anthology series, “Just for Laughs”.

Linden and Vigoda were cast in their series roles; no other eventual cast members were present. The pilot was shot on film at CBS Studio Center, where the sets of the 12th Precinct and the Miller apartment were originally built.

When the regular series went into production in late 1974, the series went to being recorded on videotape, and the sets were moved to the ABC Television Center in Hollywood, where they remained until production ended on the series in 1982.

Below is a the earliest clip I can find…this is Season 1, Episode 3. The series ran till May 20, 1982 and was created by Danny Arnold and Theodore J. Flicker. Noam Pitlik directed the majority of the episodes. Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLRxknGukm0

Snow Job for more episodes go to my fan site http://barneymiller.webs.com/

Source

January 22, 1947…KTLA Becomes 1st Commercial TV In The West

January 22, 1947…KTLA Becomes The 1st Commercial Station In The West

THIS IS A MUST SEE HISTORY OF EARLY LOS ANGELES TELEVISION!
I’ve put up only two stories today so you can have the time to see them. This amazing video is packed with ultra rare historical footage of not only KTLA, but from the early days of all the Los Angeles television stations!

You’ll hear from Bob Hope, Betty White, Steve Allen, Dinah Shore, Dick Enberg and MANY more! This 40th Anniversary broadcast posting even has a very good timeline of what comes where on the video, but if you can, make the time to see it ALL! It is one of the very best historical presentations you will ever see! ENJOY AND SHARE! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://mediaburn.org/video/ktla-anniversary-show/

[KTLA anniversary show] — Media Burn Archive

Anniversary show for the station with clips from classic programs.

Source

The Adelphi Theater History

The Adelphi Theater…By Request, A Replay Of The Famous Theater’s History





Adelphi Theater Stage Is Now…New York Hilton’s Grand Ballroom

If you ever want to conjure up the ghosts of ‘The Honeymooners’, make your way to the Grand Ballroom of the New York Hilton as that is where the stage of the Adelphi Theater was located.

After I posted the rare new photo from Peter Katz yesterday of the ‘Honeymooners’, our friend Howie Zeidman from ABC called me with this interesting information. In the color photo, you see on the left what I think is the Hilton’s ballroom entrance which is directly across from the (new) Ziegfeld Theater at 144 W. 54 Street. The Adelphi was at 152 W. 54.

In the second photo, we see a long shot up 54th from 6th Ave. By the time this photo was taken, Dumont had moved out (1957) and the theater was renamed The 54th Street Theater. It was torn down in 1970 to make way for the Hilton.

Speaking of The Ziegfeld Theater, the one shown here is not the original theater where NBC did ‘The Perry Como Show’, but it is very close. That theater was on the corner of 6th Avenue and 54th street and this new Ziegfeld movie theater was built right behind where the original was.

By the way, CBS Studio 50 (Ed Sullivan Theater) is only a couple of blocks from here. Gleason started there with CBS in 1952 and had offices in the Park Sheraton Hotel which was only a block from Studio 50. When he decided to do the half hour ‘Honeymooners’ on film, he wanted something close and choose Dumont’s Adelphi which Dumont had just equipped with their new Electronicams. Enjoy and share!
-Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #23…WHAT? And Give Up Show Business?

TeleTales #23…WHAT? And Give Up Show Business?

Just like the guy in the circus parade following the elephants, westerns for television and the movies had to have someone with a shovel following the horses too. I’m pretty sure this is one of the only pictures that shows the process of collecting “road apples” on the set. Feel free to share this rarity. -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #22…A True Classic Here’s Jackie Gleason at CBS Studio 50

TeleTales #22…A True Classic

Here’s Jackie Gleason at CBS Studio 50. Behind him is legendary cameraman Pat McBride. Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #20…A True Rarity. Television’s Only Six Shooter

TeleTales #20…A True Rarity. Television’s Only Six Shooter

This is the six lens EMI Emitron camera from 1951. That I know of, no other camera had a six lens turret. There were a couple of five lens turrets over the years, but I think this is the only six shooter. This is a monochrome studio camera used by the BBC. Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

Otis Redding’s Final Appearance…The Day Before The Plane Crash


Otis Redding’s Final Appearance…The Day Before The Plane Crash

While searching for something else, I found this and thought you may enjoy seeing it. This video is from the syndicated music show “Upbeat” that was done at WEWS in Cleveland on December 9, 1967.

Redding’s next stop was Madison, Wisconsin; the next day they were to play at The Factory nightclub near the University of Wisconsin.

Although the weather was poor, with heavy rain and fog and despite warnings, the plane took off. Four miles from their destination at Truax Field in Madison, the pilot radioed for permission to land. Shortly thereafter, the plane crashed into Lake Monona. Bar-Kays member Ben Cauley, the accident’s sole survivor.

I never met Otis, but I knew his brother Rogers and his wife Zelma. One day in 1973, they were both in my car in Macon, Georgia when a brand new song came on the radio and we were all electrified. None of us had ever heard it before, but they both said, “That’s going to be a huge record”, and it was…the song was “Let’s Get It On” from Marvin Gaye. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P29E7YYMD7o

Source

January 21, 1970…”The Johnny Cash Show” Debuts On ABC


January 21, 1970…”The Johnny Cash Show” Debuts On ABC

How’s this for a guest list…Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Fanny Flag and Doug Kesrhaw. At the link is the entire first show and if you skip around some, you’ll see Johnny do some interesting things with his guests.

The date of this episode is June 7, 1969 and the show was then only a fifteen episode summer replacement for “The Hollywood Palace”, which explains the breadth of the guests on a country music show from Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium.

The ratings were good and ABC put the show on for a whole season starting January 21, 1970. The show was canceled in 1971 as part of ABC’s involvement in the so-called “rural purge” in which all three major broadcast networks eliminated rural and older skewing programs. The purge also affected ABC’s The Lawrence Welk Show.

Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_WsvGlQrt8

6/7/69

Source

TeleTales #19…”Captain Kangaroo” Debuts On CBS

TeleTales #19…”Captain Kangaroo” Debuts On CBS From Dumont

When the show debuted on October 3, 1955, CBS was in a crunch for studio space and for several years rented studio space at The Dumont Telecenter at 205 East 67th Street. Notice the Dumont cameras in this photo from the first month of the show.

As mentioned here recently, other CBS shows that were done there include “Love Of Life”, ‘The Verdict Is Yours”, “The Edge Of Night” and “As The World Turns”, which all eventually moved to Leiderkrantz Hall. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #18…CBS Studio 59, Gary Moore’s Second Home

TeleTales #18…CBS Studio 59, Gary Moore’s Second Home

256 W 47th Street is the location of what was The Mansfield Theater and later, CBS Studio 59. Now, this is the Brooks Atkinson Theater.

CBS used the theater from 1950 till 1960 and this was the home of both “I’ve Got A Secret” and “The Garry Moore Show”, daytime edition.

When Steve Allen came to television in New York, he was first on CBS and was one of the first shows done here after the conversion. Allen was here from 1950 – 52. Other shows that came from Studio 59 were “The Sam Levinson Show”, “The Robert Q. Lewis Show” and Jimmy Dean’s daytime show. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee



Source

Amazing What You Can See, If You Know What You Are Seeing!

Amazing What You Can See, If You Know What You Are Seeing!

There are some TV secrets hiding in plane sight in this pristine color photo of NBC’s “Miss Color TV”, Marie McNamara.

This is The Colonial Theater, NBC’s first real color studio. Notice that all four prototype cameras are mounted on prototype pan heads. This cradle head model was on the Houston Fearless drawing board, but not yet in production. When testing the “coffin cameras” (see the photo in Comments) in Studio 3H from 1950 till late ’52, the regular friction pan heads were found lacking. HF made one for the coffin cameras and sent it. It worked well and three more were made and shipped, but notice they are quite narrow and were originally designed for black and white cameras. When the TK40s went into production in March of ’54, the head included with those cameras was twice the size of these prototypes.

Notice also, the dark lens turrets on two of these cameras. Amazingly, they are the turrets from the old coffin cameras that were tested at Studio 3H. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

By the way, only 25 TK40s were made. A few months into the run, RCA changed some things, including adding a vented viewfinder and made it the TK41. Vented viewfinders were swapped out on most of the old TK40s, but one in this photo still has the non vented version. I think this is around March ’54.

Source

January 20, 1989…The 100th Episode Of “Miami Vice” Airs On NBC


January 20, 1989…The 100th Episode Of “Miami Vice” Airs On NBC

At $1.3 million per episode, it was the most expensive show on television. Here’s a short story about the money, the music, the fashion and the stars. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://youtu.be/_KDIVNynsBcA short documentary about one of the most popular shows in the 80s, Miami Vice

Source

January 20, 1965…The Rolling Stones Debut On “Shindig”

January 20, 1965…The Rolling Stones Debut On “Shindig”

Actually, the Stones had been on the show two or three times before this, but this the debut of “Heart Of Stone” on American TV, which you an see at this link.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aJmyIIFW6I

Below is a rare color photo from that day with Keith Richards and Brian Jones with a TK60 behind them. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

January 20, 1961…President Kennedy Inaugurated; “Camelot” Begins

January 20, 1961…President Kennedy Inaugurated; “Camelot” Begins

Today, I am going to tell you a story you have never heard. It would be best if you watch this short clip fist to set the mood. The second half is especially rich for those of us who remember these years.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8h7E5rtnFH4

On November 8, 1960, Massachusetts Senator John Kennedy was elected President of The United States. A month before, on October 6, 1960, “Camelot” made it’s world debut in Toronto for a month of preview performances. In the first week of November, the show moved to Boston for another month of previews, where more revisions were made to the performance as it headed to Broadway.

This is where President Elect Kennedy and his wife Jackie first saw the show, and given copies of the original cast recording by his friends Alan Lerner and Fredrick Loewe. Kennedy and Lerner had gone to prep school together.

On December 3, 1960, “Camelot”, the most anticipated new musical in years, opened on Broadway at The Majestic Theater starring Richard Burton and Julie Andrews. On it’s way there, it had gone though a lot of revision and the stress of reworking the play had put both Lerner and Loewe in the hospital with a heart attack and ulcer. The difficulty got them the cover of Time Magazine the second week of November with the lead story, “A Rough Road To Broadway”. On the cover of Time the week before, and the week after…JFK.

Who can forget the night Marilyn Monroe sang to the President at his 45th birthday at Madison Square Gardens? The next year, Learner and Loewe gave JFK his last birthday party at The Waldorf Astoria.

According to Ted Kennedy, only family and few close friends knew that JFK was actually a very good singer. At The White House, he would occasionally sing along with songs he and Jackie played before going to bed. The singing was occasional, but listening to music at the end of the day was a ritual that helped ease the pressures of the job, and some of his physical pains.

A week after his death, Jackie Kennedy gave an interview to Life Magazine. In it, she said that her husbands all time favorite song was “Camelot”, and went on to quote their favorite line…

“Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment, that was known as Camelot”.

She ended the interview with these words…”There will be great presidents again, but there will never be another Camelot.”

The sense of loss felt by the public and the association between the song and the show was evident to all as “Camelot” toured the U.S. in the months after JFK’s death. When the houselights came up following the “Camelot” finale, the audience was often crying en masse.

There is detail on the photos, so please click on each. Enjoy and please share this! -Bobby Ellerbee









Source

Remembering Tony Verna…Inventor Of Instant Replay

Remembering Tony Verna…Inventor Of Instant Replay

http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/id/12193968/tony-verna-inventor-tv-instant-replay-dies

Tony Verna, inventor of TV instant replay, dies

Tony Verna, a television director and producer who invented instant replay for live sports 51 years ago, has died. He was 81.

Source

TeleTales #16…The Rube Goldberg Magic Of Busby Berkely

TeleTales #16…The Rube Goldberg Magic Of Busby Berkely

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csG6MBYsmOU
At the 8 minute mark in this video you’ll see this contraption on the big screen in the “By A Waterfall” scene of “Foot Light Parade” from 1933 staring Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler. If you start about 3 minutes earlier, you will see some of what Berkely was famous for…those beautifully choreographed, elaborate, geometric overhead shots.

In the big picture, we see the mechanism itself before it was dressed for the stage. As you see in the video, it also squirts water which means hoses had to be built into it too. The many gizmos behind his magic are mechanical wonders in themselves. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee



Source

TeleTales #15…Setting Up For The Greatest Car Chase Ever

TeleTales #15…Setting Up For The Greatest Car Chase Ever

“The French Connection” principal car chase scene was widely considered to be the best ever put on film at the time, overtaking Bullitt (1968) for that honor.

There was no official permit from the city for the chase which was done with the help of off duty policemen. The car crash during the chase sequence, at the intersection of Stillwell Ave. and 86th St., was unplanned and was included because of its realism. The man whose car was hit had just left his house a few blocks from the intersection to go to work and was unaware that a car chase was being filmed. The producers later paid the bill for the repairs to his car.

By the way…according to director William Friedkin, the significance of the straw hat being tossed onto the shelf of the rear window in Doyle and Russo’s car was that at that time, it was a universal signal in New York City that the undercover cops in the car were on duty. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #14…Tiny Men Or Giant Props?

TeleTales #14…Tiny Men Or Giant Props?

If you look at this long enough, you begin to wonder. The props are amazingly real looking aren’t they? They are from 1957’s “The Incredible Shrinking Man”. To simulate giant rain drops, prop men filled hundreds of condoms with water…many of which never made it to the set because of frequent water balloon fights. Condoms were used because they were clear and not colored like balloons, which looked more real as they fell. Enjoy and share. -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #13…”Some Like It Hot”, 1959

TeleTales #13…”Some Like It Hot”, 1959

Did you know that when Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon first put on the female make-up and costumes, they walked around the Goldwyn Studios lot to see if they could “pass” as women? It worked, but just to make sure, they then tried using mirrors in public ladies rooms to fix their makeup, and when none of the women using it complained, they knew they could be convincing as women. There is a scene on the train recreating this moment.

Danny Kaye and Bob Hope were considered for the roles that went to Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis. Jerry Lewis was offered the role ultimately played by Jack Lemmon, but declined because he didn’t want to dress in drag. When Lemmon received an Oscar for the role that Lewis gave up, Lewis claims Jack sent him chocolates every year to thank him. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #12…World’s First SNL Photo Bomb?

TeleTales #12…World’s First SNL Photo Bomb?

Could be. By the way, in case you are not visiting this page daily, there’s a good chance you are missing about half of what I post here. Just click on the blue text in the upper left corner and poof…you’re here! Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

“All In The Family”…Best Retrospective Ever, In Five Parts


“All In The Family”…Best Retrospective Ever, In Five Parts

Last week, January 12, was the show’s anniversary and many of you asked for more. MSNBC’s “Time And Again” was in itself a great show that did an excellent job of documenting media history, so here is their April 2000 look at The Bunkers. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_NFrYyqMeY Part 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mm9ocfgi1Qc Part 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZVhMsbXFtY Part 3
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4n6p2DwC-DY Part 4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QL98vlLmInI Part 5

From April 18, 2000, here is a great inside look at the sitcom to end all sitcoms, “All in the Family.” This is pat of the “Time and Again” series that MSNBC…

Source

Dr. Lee De Forest…Pioneer Of Electronic Media; Wireless To Talkies


Dr. Lee De Forest…Pioneer Of Electronic Media; Wireless To Talkies

Lee de Forest’s entire life was devoted to the invention of media technology primarily based on sound. He supplied the missing voice to radio and film.

Here is his 1957 appearance on ‘This Is Your Life’ from what I think is either Studio 1 or 3 from the brand new NBC Burbank. There are a few interesting shots from the control room and of the studio scattered around the first prat of the video. There is even a rare appearance from Allan B. Dumont.

Following a solid Yale education in Physics and Electricity, he spent the decade between 1900 and 1910 improving the wireless telegraph, but he quickly tired of its limitations of sending coded messages. In 1906 he filed his first patent for the vacuum tube he called the Audion, describing it as a detector of sound.

By 1907 he had invented an arc-based radiotelephone transmitter and Audion receiver, and he was writing about the possibility of sending music into homes by wireless. Between 1910 and 1920 he improved his Audion as a detector, an amplifier, and later a transmitter of radio. He started several radio stations. He was an early if not the first broadcaster of entertainment-based audio, primarily opera music.

Between 1920 to 1930 he invented, patented and improved upon a system of recording a sound track on a strip of film, thus allowing accurate synchronization with the picture. Lee de Forest had invented the Talking Motion Picture. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnlMUZfPdlg

This show is about my Grandfather, Lee deForest. At the shot of his Grandchildren, I’m on the lower left. I was 9 at the time. Please enjoy! There are even s…

Source

TeleTales #10…Ghostbustin’

TeleTales #10…Ghostbustin’

Here’s a WNBC TK76 shooting a local news segment on the movie in production and some of the traffic problems it was causing around town in 1984. Did you know that the original casting was intended to be John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy as the Ghostbusters and John Candy as Lewis/Gozier? Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #9…Remember This?

TeleTales #9…Remember This?

This is one of several posters MAD artist Jack Davis did for Ampex. These were usually given out at NAB conventions in the early 70s. I have been asked many times if there are hi res versions, but not that I can find. Anyone have better images? Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #8…Remember These?

TeleTales #8…Remember These?

Back before everything became “disposable” (meaning there was no one to fix it if it broke), there were men that would come to your house to fix your TV set. These little cases were full of tools and tubes, and if you had a pro…he had a mirror too. Click Like if you know why.

Old times gone, but not forgotten. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

Source

TeleTales #7…For Queen And Country, But Not On A Dare

TeleTales #7…For Queen And Country, But Not On A Dare

I get queeze just looking at this, and we only see about half of what looks to be about a 40 foot platform without a rope or rail in site. This is CBC cameraman in Halifax, Nova Scotia covering the 1959 royal visit from Queen Elizabeth. Enjoy and share, but don’t tell OSHA. -Bobby Ellerbee

By the way, I’m picking up the numbering that I left off with yesterday, so you didn’t miss six TeleTales today, but if you missed them yesterday, please always visit this page…just click the blue text in the upper left corner.

Source

‘The Nightly Show’…Debuts Tomorrow Night, But The Set Is Ready!


‘The Nightly Show’…Debuts Tomorrow Night, But The Set Is Ready!

Now that Steven Colbert has “left the building” so to speak, Larry Wilmore is taking his time slot and studio. Here’s great time lapse video of the set being built at NEP Studio 54 and 512 W 54th Street which is managed by our friend Bill Willig.

Speaking of friends, I think Charlie Huntley is settling down his schedule some and has taken his position behind the camera on this show, which I understand has been in rehearsal since last Monday. Break A Leg All! Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.cc.com/video-clips/j5pujs/the-nightly-show-the-nightly-show-with-larry-wilmore—studio-timelapseThe Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore premieres on January 19 — and the set is all ready.

Source

Scroll Up