Posts in Category: Broadcast History

The Final Guy Lombardo New Year With Ben Grauer Reporting Live


The Final Guy Lombardo New Year With Ben Grauer Reporting Live

By the next new year, both Guy and Ben would have passed away, but this was the night of December 31, 1976. Below is some history on the Lombardo broadcast years and some things about Ben Grauer that you may never have known.

The band’s first New Year’s Eve radio broadcast was in 1928; within a few years, they were heard live on the CBS Radio Network before midnight Eastern Time, then on the NBC Radio Network after midnight.

On December 31, 1956, the Lombardo band did their first New Year’s TV special on CBS; the program (and Lombardo’s 20 subsequent New Year’s Eve TV shows) included a live segment from Times Square that during the early years were hosed by pioneer broadcast journalist Robert Trout . In later years, another longtime newsman, Ben Grauer, reported from Times Square, though Grauer worked for NBC.

Grauer’s greatest fame lies in his legendary 40-year career in radio. In 1930, the 22-year-old Benjamin Franklin Grauer joined the staff at NBC. He quickly rose through the ranks to become a senior commentator and reporter. He was the designated announcer for the popular 1940s ‘Walter Winchell’s Jergens Journal’. Perhaps, most importantly, he was selected by Arturo Toscanini to become the voice of the NBC Symphony Orchestra. Grauer took over as announcer in 1940 and remained until the orchestra was disbanded in June 1954. Toscanini said he was his favorite announcer.

Starting in 1932, Grauer covered the Olympic Games, presidential inaugurations and international events. During his radio career, Grauer covered nearly every major historic event, including the Morro Castle fire, the Paris Peace Conference and the US occupation of Japan.

Millions remember his NBC coverage of the New Year’s celebrations on both radio and TV. Between 1951 and 1969, Grauer covered these events 11 times live from New York’s Times Square. He continued covering New Year’s Eve for Guy Lombardo’s New Year’s Eve specials on CBS in the 1970s, with his last appearance on December 31, 1976, the year before both he and Lombardo died.

From the mid-1950s until the mid-1960s, Grauer’s reports were part of the ‘Tonight’ show, where he worked with Johnny Carson and prior to that, Jack Paar, and Steve Allen. Grauer was also one of NBC Radio’s Monitor “Communicators” from 1955 to 1960.

Grauer provided the commentary for NBC’s first television special, the opening in 1939 of the New York World’s Fair. In 1948, Grauer, working with anchor John Cameron Swayze, provided the first extensive live network TV coverage of the national political conventions.

In 1954, NBC began broadcasting some of their shows in living color, and in 1957, the animated Peacock logo made its debut. It was Grauer who first spoke the now famous words, “The following program is brought to you in living color on NBC,” behind the Peacock graphic. Enjoy, share and Happy New Year! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBD1yHHgaEk

From Dec. 31, 1976, here is the CBS coverage of New Years Eve at Times Square with Ben Grauer (who passed away a few months later) and Guy Lombardo, who also…

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This Will Bring Back Some Memories! 1976 – 2012 Countdowns


This Will Bring Back Some Memories! 1976 – 2012 Countdowns

On December 31, 1972, the first edition of ‘Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin Eve’ show aired on NBC. The special featured pre-recorded musical performances from the ballroom of the Queen Mary in Long Beach, California by Blood, Sweat & Tears, Helen Reddy, Al Green, and Three Dog Night. Clark served as a reporter from Times Square for live coverage of the ball drop and arrival of 1973.

The second special, ‘New Year’s Rockin’ Eve 1974′, also on NBC, was hosted by comedian George Carlin and featured musical performances by The Pointer Sisters, Billy Preston, Linda Ronstadt and Tower of Power – once again pre-recorded on the Queen Mary with Clark live in New York.

Beginning with the 1975 edition, the program moved to ABC and
Clark assumed hosting duties of the show that was now done live from Times Square. Enjoy, share and Happy New Year! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJEiWRHpKig

All of them

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The Rose Parade…A Uniquely American Tradition And Color Spectacular

The Rose Parade…A Uniquely American Tradition And Color Spectacular

First, if you are working Times Square, Bowl Games or other holiday shows, please remember to send us some pictures via a Facebook message to me or send them to edition4@comcast.net.

I just heard from our friend Roger Crawford, senior video for ESPN/ABC. He and the other network mobile units are at Orange Grove and Colorado in Pasadena. Roger is going to get us some pictures of one of the most amazing parades in the world and how it’s covered. Of course the parade itself is January 1 but we hope to see some rehearsal and set up pix tomorrow.

Below, we see two color shots from 1961 and 1959. The original NBC Color mobile units did their first ever broadcast from here January 1, 1954 and we see them here in a Los Angeles publicity shot. The final photo is a screen shot taken in 1940 when Don Lee’s W6XAO did the first ever television broadcast to some 200 set owners in LA. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee




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The Three Headed Monster From ‘I Love Lucy’ UPDATE:

Picture Parade #5…The Three Headed Monster From ‘I Love Lucy’

UPDATE: Daniel Cahn, son of Lucy editor Dann Cahn, has added new information and photos in the comments section! Be sure to see this.

One of the first obstacles to overcome on ‘I Love Lucy’ was how to edit the show. Pictured here is editor Dann Cahn (jacket) and Bud Molin with the custom machine originally built for ‘Burns And Allen’. Below is part of a Motion Picture Editors Guild article describing a typical week. Many thanks to Daniel Cahn for the extended remarks and photos in the comments section. He is the son of Dann Cahn and a third generation editor.

The schedule was tight, Cahn related, especially compared to the more familiar pace of feature film editing. A new episode had a table read on Monday, rehearsal on Tuesday, camera rehearsal on Wednesday, and a full camera run-through on Thursday. On Friday evening in front of a live audience, the episode was filmed, in scripted scene order; the film was processed, printed, and in the cutting room on Monday morning usually by eight AM. Dann marked with a grease pencil, Bud made the cuts (with scissors) and pasted; cut scenes were then adjusted and fixed. The editor’s cut was ready to screen with the director by the time rehearsals for the next episode were already under way. Very quickly, due to demands on set, and with Cahn’s natural ability at cutting comedy and working fast, the director’s cut dissipated. A pattern of six-day work weeks and 14-hour days was unavoidably established.

In the context of the high-pressure schedule, he recalled, “They thought that the Monster would enable me to do everything, but it was just a tool, like the Avid is today; we couldn’t do everything within the time constraints! It’s expected today that picture editors do temp sound and music work.” The crew quickly increased to include an apprentice and an additional editor for sound effects and music. Dann remembered Desi’s remark to him, “Danny you want a crew bigger than my band? But that that’s exactly what eventually happened as Desilu expanded its productions as well as Cahn’s role in the company.

Inevitably, just as the workload seemed more manageable with his expanded crew working on the first episode, it was decided that the second episode would air first. The reaction to the second episode was so strong, the sponsor and CBS decided to the switch the air dates. The six-day editorial work week immediately shifted to seven days, and within four weeks all the editing and sound work, opticals, negative cutting and answer print was completed and delivered within hours of airtime. In addition to these unforeseen shakeups, Cahn also had to think creatively and act fast, especially when things didn’t run as smoothly as planned.

The first serious technical issue the editing team confronted was one still familiar to assistant editors today; fixing out of sync dailies. The three-camera setup used a “blue light” system instead of the traditional clapper; as the camera rolled at the start of a scene, all the film rolls were buzzed and flashed with a light that was exposed onto a frame of film and soundtrack. The three-camera setup was interlocked so that the flash would occur on all three cameras simultaneously. However, the flash from the three different cameras never actually wound up in the same place, as intended, so the task of eye synching most of the footage was added to the crunched schedule. After the first few shows, Cahn decided to go to the studio mill and make a giant sized wooden clapper that would cover all three cameras, and the sync problem was resolved. He then recalled Karl Freund’s wisecrack to Jess Oppenheimer, “We’ve got a bright boy here; with this giant clapper he’s reinvented the wheel!”

I asked Dann about music cues and how that developed. “Director Marc Daniels’ experience was in live theater, and that kind of spontaneity was great for the show, but not to get the music cues I needed for a cut,” he explained. I’d get music with dailies, but they were never the right length and nothing ever matched. So to get around this, I’d cut the episode and take the timings to the set on Friday, just like we did in features; the band was set up, and I’d give them my list of cues to record. They had to learn that not everything could happen all at once in the cutting room; it wasn’t like live TV or theater. The show had to be scored just like a movie and I was always adapting motion picture techniques to everything we did!”

There is more at the link. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.editorsguild.com/FromTheGuild.cfm?FromTheGuildid=119

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Can You Spot The Hidden Camera Portal?

Picture Parade #4…Let’s Play This ‘Match Game’ Style OK?

The square behind Lucy’s right shoulder is a _________________.
Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

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The First Electronic Color Cameras, 1949

Picture Parade #3…The First Electronic Color Cameras, 1949

In the large picture, we see RCA’s lead color engineer Richard C. Webb with one of the cameras with the housing off. I think the center channel is green with red on the right and blue on the left. Notice the dichroic mirrors are in front of the lenses.

In the next photos, we see some of the constant early testing and a photo of the monitor. These two shots are from NBC Studio 3H where testing moved around 1950. The final photo is from the original color test facility in Washington DC at the Wardham Park Hotel studio. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee




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Classic Jackie Gleason

Picture Parade #2…Classic Jackie Gleason

This is early afternoon, Saturday February 5, 1955. Camera blocking is still going on and CBS veteran Pat McBride is just behind Jackie. This is Studio 50, or what we now call The Ed Sullivan Theater, although Gleason was the first big show from here.

This is the variety show in rehearsal for that night’s broadcast which would include a Honeymooners sketch called “Cupid”. In the sketch, Ralph tries to help out a lonely old friend by setting him up with a blind date, but the gossip grapevine leads Alice to believe that Ralph is trying to land dates for himself. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

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WCBW TV, New York, 1946

Picture Parade #1…WCBW TV, New York, 1946

This is a rare picture of the RCA A500 Iconoscope cameras at CBS Grand Central Terminal, but this is not a network show and it may surprise you to know that there was no CBS Television Network till 1948. This looks like a game show, but what ever it is is local. Only Dumont and NBC had television networks at this point.

By the way, these early pedestals had electric motors in the base to raise and lower them and the cable went down inside the lift column to keep it out of the way. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

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Who Knew? Charlie Chaplin Was A Keystone Cop! Take A Look…


Who Knew? Charlie Chaplin Was A Keystone Cop! Take A Look…

As I watched the Chaplin bloopers posted just before this, I was thinking how great it would be to see Keystone Cop bloopers, but I found something ever better.

This is a very interesting short bio piece on the Keystone Cops…Chaplin’s appearance is only one of several surprises. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVNSQ72wvlc

This tribute to the Keystone Cops was produced by authors Lon and Debra Davis and video editor Barry Thompson.It tells the heretofore unknown story of Robert…

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Just For Fun…Charlie Chaplin Blooper And Outtake Reel


Just For Fun…Charlie Chaplin Blooper And Outtake Reel

Did you know that one of Chaplin’s first jobs for Max Sennett was as a Keystone Cop? I’ll have that story in today’s next post. Did you know that along with D W Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, that Chaplin was one of the founders of United Artists? Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

#t=80″ target=”_blank”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2A_xERLt-2U #t=80

Chaplin was a perfectionist, but he wasn’t always perfect. Check out these bloopers or outtakes from the sets of his films.

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The Early Shift: Behind the Scenes of ‘Today,’ ‘This Morning’ and ‘Good Morning America’

Behind The Scenes Of The Morning Shows…ABC, CBS And NBC

Thanks to The New York Times, here is a rare and interesting 24 shot slide show of the early morning preparations for the casts of the three big network morning shows. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/29/business/media/behind-the-scenes-of-today-this-morning-and-good-morning-america.html#

The Early Shift: Behind the Scenes of ‘Today,’ ‘This Morning’ and ‘Good Morning America’

In the dark hours of the morning, some of television’s biggest celebrities are already rolling out into the streets of the city that never sleeps.

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December 30, 1963…’Let’s Make A Deal’ Debuts On NBC


December 30, 1963…’Let’s Make A Deal’ Debuts On NBC

Here is the pilot, complete with a TK41 in the foreground of the intro shot at NBC Burbank May 25, 1963. The original edition of the show was a daytime series that ran on NBC, but moved to ABC in 1968 where it ran until 1976. A weekly nighttime syndicated edition of the show was broadcast from 1971 to 1977. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvNXm_5kLmo

This 37 minute pilot, produced on May 25, 1963 with Monty Hall as host and Wendell Niles as announcer/sidekick, led to the premiere of Let’s Make a Deal on N…

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‘CBS Sunday Morning’ Cameraman Allen Brown Retires…

‘CBS Sunday Morning’ Cameraman Allen Brown Retires…

Yesterday was Allen’s last day as a CBS cameraman, but soon, he will return to ‘Sunday Morning’ which he has worked on from almost it’s first day on the air. Celebrating 40 years at The Tiffany network, Allen has seen more than a little television history in the making on shows like ‘The Guiding Light’ where he spent ten years and with Walter Cronkite in Studio 33. Congratulations Allen and thanks to Craig Wilson for the photos. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee




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Video Rarity #4…Inside ABC Studio TV 2, November 7, 1952


Video Rarity #4…Inside ABC Studio TV 2, November 7, 1952

This show-within-a-show depicts a live telecast of ‘Tales of Tomorrow’, an actual ABC dramatic series, which keeps being broken into by a phantom broadcast. It’s far fetched, but it gives us a rare look at the early years of ABC’s TV 2. At 4:58, 7:16, 15:20, 20:07 and 21:58 we get some good long looks into TV 2. My guess is that the apartment scene is taking place in TV 1, just next door. Speaking of doors, that’s how we know where this is. That back door where many of the telephone calls are made from, and the location of the control room I think nail down TV 2 as the location.

There are some nice shots of the ABC TK10s in action and although there is no logo on the main camera, there is an ABC logo on the crane camera and on a few of the studio desks.

The “lover” is Rod Steiger in one of his first television roles. At the end, notice in the credits and the VO, the people in the studio are not actors…they are real ABC studio employees. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://archive.org/details/TalesOfTomorrow-LostPlanetLast one I have. Kind of cool to see a 1950’s TV studio step outside of the box. An early experiment in TV.

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Video Rarity #3…This Is About As Awkward As Live TV Gets!


Video Rarity #3…This Is About As Awkward As Live TV Gets!

Before we get to the meat, notice the rare opening shot from the new control room ABC built for ‘The Jerry Lewis Show’ at Vine Street.

At around 3:45, we get to the original Jay Leno – Conan O’Brien moment. After a kind of cool reception from the audience, Lewis announces the show has been canceled, yet there are four more shows to go. How’s that for awkward?

The only other time I have seen this happen before this was when CBS canceled ‘The Jimmy Dean Show’ with a few weeks to go. By the way, after the cancellation, ABC put a new show in this theater and time slot…’The Hollywood Palace’, which debuted January 4, 1964, just two weeks after the last Lewis show.

Although Lewis is a brilliant talent, for some reason, he just couldn’t get this show of the ground. Even this performance seems a bit flat and stilted, but given the circumstances, maybe that is predictable. I don’t know if that’s flop sweat or he forgot his makeup, but either way, he’s pretty shiny. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GutZv_D7DKk

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Video Rarity #2…Jerry Lewis Sings On A Crane With A TK60…


Video Rarity #2…Jerry Lewis Sings On A Crane With A TK60…MUST SEE!

This is as good as it gets and is one of my all-time favorite clips! Here, Jerry spends over three minutes on a Chapman Electra singing “Birth Of The Blues”. He gets the full treatment too, as they boom him out over the audience and up to the balcony.

This rare clip is from his short lived (13 week) ‘Jerry Lewis Show’ on ABC in 1963. It was a 90 minute Saturday night show and even though ABC had gone all out in promotion and totally redone the Vine Street Theater to make it The Jerry Lewis Theater, ratings were not good and the two year deal came to an awkward end. More on this in the next clip. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://youtu.be/hGIMNOtpzps?t=3m26s

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Video Rarity #1…Jerry Lewis Hosts ‘Tonight’ With TK41 Shot


Video Rarity #1…Jerry Lewis Hosts ‘Tonight’ With TK41 Shot

This is doubly rare! First, you almost never saw the TK41s on the ‘Tonight’ show with Jack Paar or Johnny Carson, but at the 3:00 minute mark, we do! Announcer and Paar sidekick Hugh Downs is off camera in Studio 6B, but to make a point in his story, Jerry walks over to him which is where we get a good look.

Second, this Lewis appearance is one of the few surviving clips of guest hosts during the Paar – Carson transition. Jack left March 30, 1962 and Johnny took over October 1, six months later, after his ABC contact had expired. The clip itself is quite historic and entertaining. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmNF01AXI1I

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The evolution of ESPN: 35 years in the making

The Start Of ESPN…A Hometown Newspaper Article From The Birstol Press

Today there are only seventeen of the original staffers that started with ESPN in 1979, and this story is told by three of them. Thanks to ESPN cameraman Ryan Balton for sending this along. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

By the way…Bristol, Connecticut is where ESPN is located. Until a few years back, I didn’t know where their HQ was either.

http://m.centralctcommunications.com/bristolpress/news/article_592230c6-8e32-11e4-8b55-d3b75fca33f2.html?mode=jqm

The evolution of ESPN: 35 years in the making

BRISTOL — When ESPN went on the air 35 years ago, it had one building, a trailer full of production equipment and lots of mud everywhere.

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The Start Of CNN…January – June 1980

The Start Of CNN…January – June 1980 Photos From Jeff Jeffares

Jeff was hired January 2, 1980 at CNN to help Chief Engineer Jack Ormond put it all together, and was one of the original 200 hires. In the beginning, there was a big empty studio and boxes of new equipment everywhere. Oh, and wires….lots of wire and cable that had to be run.

Below we see the RCA TK47s that Jeff unpacked and set up. In the second photo we see what would become “the pit” with it’s switching gear in place, but with no cabinets yet. In the color photo, we see a May rehearsal less than a month before the June 1, 1980 sign on with Jeff at the TD position (nearest). Finally, the Grass Valley 1600 switcher with E Mem still in the crate.

The Cable News Network was launched at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on June 1, 1980. After an introduction by Ted Turner, the husband and wife team of David Walker and Lois Hart anchored the channel’s first newscast. Burt Reinhardt, the executive vice president of CNN at its launch, hired most of the channel’s first 200 employees, including the network’s first news anchor, Bernard Shaw.

This summer, CNN will celebrate it’s 35th Anniversary. Thanks to Jeff for sharing these rare pictures…many more are headed for the scanner, so stay tuned! Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee




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76 Trombones And A Cameraman!

Picture Parade #6…76 Trombones And A Cameraman!

Now you know the secret. Back in the early days of portable cameras, this is how they hid the cameraman in the big parades. This Macy’s shot reminds me that The Rose Parade is just a few days away. If any of you are working that, bowl game or Times Square, send us your rehearsal and facilities check pictures. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

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It’s The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year

Picture Parade #5…It’s The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year

The Andy Williams Christmas Specials were always great, but his weekly show was also a piece of art, in every way. There were always lots of crane shots and elevated performances, like the one seen here during rehearsal at NBC Burbank. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

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Recognize This? Think About Jackie Gleason…

Picture Parade #1…Recognize This? Think About Jackie Gleason…

The building with the red facade is 328 Chauncey Street in Brooklyn as it looks today. Jackie Gleasen grew up here and later used the address as that of Ralph and Alice Kramden on ‘The Honeymooners’. Originally named Herbert Walton Gleason Jr., he was baptized John Herbert Gleason. His parents were Mae “Maisie” Kelly, a subway change-booth attendant, and Herbert Walton “Herb” Gleason, an insurance auditor. Enjoy and remember to visit the EOAG page or you will miss some posts! -Bobby Ellerbee

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Speaking Of Norelco Cameras…Here Is A Classic Ad For The PC70

Speaking Of Norelco Cameras…Here Is A Classic Ad For The PC70


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CBS New York, Deep Studio History…Part 2

CBS New York, Deep Studio History…Part 2

Before we start, a word on the photo. We see three brand new Norelco PC60s…so new their CBS Color logos have yet to be applied. I think this may be in Studio 43 or 44. Can anyone tell?

The following is part of an chain of emails a few months ago between myself, Game Show Network Historian David Schwartz and CBS staffer Bruce Martin. The original question was “what were the first shows at The CBS Broadcast Center”?

Before it became the CBS Broadcast Center, it was the CBS Production Center. What would later become the studios on the second floor were giant rehearsal halls and scenery storage areas. Other parts of the building were used as offices for the shows, including Ed Sullivan’s production office.

Over the summer of 1964, 524 East 57th Street was a busy place making ready for operations and programs to begin arriving in August. The transfer from Grand Central to the Broadcast Center was done in a gradual process over the course of a few weeks. Production was rolled in slowly too, as I think only Studios 43, 44, 45 and 46 were equipped with the new Norelco color cameras. 41 and 42 are the biggest studios and as you will see, they were not put into service till November of ’64.

The WCBS Radio local news may have been the first broadcast from there, and it is possible ‘The CBS Evening News With Walter Cronkite’ was among the first network television shows to originate there from the new newsroom studio on the first floor. All the big new studios were on the second floor.

The Cronkite newsroom studio at the Broadcast Center, looked almost exactly like their newsroom studio in The Graybar Building. As a side note, I just found out yesterday in a conversation with CBS Floor Manager Locke Wallace, who was at CBS from 1955 till 1997, that ‘Douglas Edwards And The News’ had come from Studio 41 at Grand Central. When Cronkite took over, he too reported from Studio 41 until the move to The Graybar Building newsroom around 1959. WCBS local news was in the smaller Studio 42 at Grand Central. Early on, Douglas Edwards had come from the CBS HQ building at 485 Madison Avenue and later from Leiderkranz Hall. The Edwards move to Grand Central’s Studio 41 probably came around 1957.

Just to clear up any confusion, the first two CBS studios ever were 41 and 42 at Grand Central. When the move to The Broadcast Center came, it was decided as an honorarium, to name the two biggest studios there 41 and 42 after their historic predecessors at Grand Central. At GC, there was also Studio 43 and 44, but they were not productions studios…they were control and telecine facilities, but were called studios.

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Bruce Martin wrote:

When I first arrived at the CBS Broadcast Center in August,1964, here were the studio assignments:
Studio 41 – Election set and light for Campaign ’64 that did not air until November 3rd.
Studio 42 – basically dark until the end of November when ‘Love of Life’ and ‘Secret Storm’ came over from Leiderkranz Hall.
Studio 43 – ‘Captain Kangaroo’ and ‘Mr. Mayor’
Studio 44 – ‘Search for Tomorrow’
Studio 45 – ‘Guiding Light’
Studio 46 – WCBS-TV local news, some commercial tapings, and there was a 10:00 am Mike Wallace local news show. Also, ‘Sunrise Semester’ was here.

Outside Studios:
Studio 50 – Sullivan/Gleason/Candid Camera/Gary Moore prime time
Studio 52 – Line/Secret/Truth/Password/Ted Mack/Alumni Fun/Jack Benny when visiting
Studio 61 – ‘The Edge of Night’ – see below, it obviously came over a little later.
Studio 65 – ‘As the World Turns’

I believe World Turns and Edge both started at the DuMont TeleCenter Studios at 205 East 67th Street both on April 2, 1956. Edge moved to Studio 72 after Verdict moved to Hollywood and World Turns moved to Studio 65 around 1963. Studio 65 was reserved for a weekly Judy Garland show, but in April, 1963 she decided to do all her shows at CBS Television City in Hollywood.

Edge moved to Studio 61 after some David Susskind drama specials left. Sometimes, “Candid Camera” and “On Broadway Tonight” aired there until the end of the summer, 1965. Edge moved there in the fall of 1965. Bruce
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David Schwartz wrote:

Studio 57 was called The Peace Theater, 1280 Fifth Avenue at 109th Street. CBS used it for the original Field Sequential color broadcasts in 1951. The color shows ended in October 1951. It was used by Mike & Buff, The Egg and I, Valiant Lady, Red Brown & the Rocket Rangers and Hotel Cosmopolitan (1957-58). That appears to be the last time I find a show originating from there. Mike & Buff may have also come from another studio (there is an overlap in shows there in 1952-53)

Studio 58 was the Town Theater, 851 Ninth Avenue. It later became a studio for WNET, then Unitel. Fred Waring and Vaughn Monroe did their shows from there, as did Mama and Playhouse 90. Later Sesame Street called it home, and later it was used by Jane Pratt in the 1990’s and Emmerill Live for the Food Network. There are probably other shows that I don’t know about yet.

Studio 72 was home to The Verdict is Yours. That show was moved to Los Angeles in the summer of 1960 and I found no other shows coming from that studio. It later became Reeves Teletape, then Conran’s Dept. Store and Staples. David Schwartz

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Just to clarify things a bit, there were other CBS theater studios in use and continued for a few years after the Broadcast Center opened, namely Studio 52 and 50.

I want to add a little to the Studio 72 conversation. This was the only CBS color facility on the east coast. It had 4 RCA TK41s and 1 TK40. It went into service in the fall of 1954 after extensive remodeling of the old vaudeville theater was completed. Several color specials were done there including ‘Cinderella’ and ‘Jack And The Beanstalk’. By around 1956, CBS had cut its color programming to next to nothing from the east coast and the little color done was from Television City. Believe it or not, the studio got little use, and even when it did get used, the color cameras and tape machines there shot the a few specials and overflow shows in black and white. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

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December 28, 1956…The Last ‘Ding Dong School’ Airs On NBC


December 28, 1956…The Last ‘Ding Dong School’ Airs On NBC

‘Ding Dong School’ was developed by NBC’s Chicago station WNBQ and was first broadcast November 24, 1952. The show quickly gained popularity among young children and soon, was broadcast nationally on the NBC network, Monday through Friday. In that year, Dr. Frances Horwich, the shows host and creator, won a Peabody Award. The series is said to have garnered a 95 percent share of all preschoolers at one time. I was one of them…you too?

In 1954, NBC moved the show to New York where “Miss Francis” was put in charge all of NBC’s children’s programming. She held this position until 1956, when ‘Ding Dong School’ was canceled. Horwich owned the rights to Ding Dong School and syndicated the show until 1965.

Before starting the show, Dr. Horwich had earned her master’s degree in education at Columbia University and her doctorate at Northwestern University, and was the head of the department of education at Chicago’s Roosevelt College. She is cited as having invented the television technique of speaking to the children watching as if they were in the same room across from you. Those who subsequently adopted this style included Fred Rogers, ‘Romper Room’ and ‘Sesame Street’. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1TU3h8dQOw

In this episode of the popular, Emmy-nominated children’s television series, Miss Frances (Dr. Frances Horwich) instructs children how to make a peanut butte…

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Speaking Of Howdy Doody…Here’s A Little Something Extra!


Speaking Of Howdy Doody…Here’s A Little Something Extra!

You never know who you’ll meet here at EOAG, and this morning I found this fun video in a message from Barry Mitchell, who many of you will recognize. Here, Barry visits Buffalo Bob Smith in his home and we get a look at one of the real and original Howdy Doody puppets who lives with Bob.

Barry also visits with Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney, Sheri Lewis’s daughter Mallory Lewis and Lamb Chop, Jimmy Nelson and Farfel, and Jim Henson’s daughter, Cheryl Henson. From Barryfunny.com.
Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfuGKnkyt3c

Barry Mitchell proves he’s no dummy while hanging out with Mallory Lewis and Lamb Chop, Paul Winchell and Jerry Mahoney, Buffalo Bob Smith and Howdy Doody, J…

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4…3…2…1!!! Then…Happy New Year From Times Square!

4…3…2…1!!! Then…Happy New Year From Times Square!

Thanks to Antony Quintano, here are some shots of workmen installing 288 new Waterford Crystal triangles to the 2,688 that decorate the massive ball. It drops in just four days now.

For 15 years, Waterford crystal triangles have adorned the Times Square New Year’s Eve Ball. Each year, Waterford designers introduce a new signature cut crystal pattern to become part of the current series of crystal sentiments. Premiering last year in 2014 and continuing through 2023, the “Greatest Gifts” collection marks the longest series to-date. The 2,688 crystal panels that decorate the Waterford Ball were designed in Waterford, Ireland. This year, 288 of the 2,688 crystal panels will be changed to the 2015 “Gift of Fortitude” design. Enjoy, share and Happy New Year! -Bobby Ellerbee




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Fantastic Steve Allen Video Bio!


Yesterday, Steve Allen Would Have Turned 93…Here’s A Fantastic Salute!

With the Jack Benny tribute yesterday, I wanted to hold this till today when you would have time to watch this. Of all the bio and tribute shows I have seen, THIS IS THE BEST EVER! Really!

There is very rare footage here of Steve’s carrier and even the very first ‘Jose Jimenez’ sketch from Bill Dana who Allen discovered, along with Don Knotts, Tim Conway, Tom Poston, Louis Nye and more… you will see them ALL, and MORE here! This is just amazing! Get some coffee, click start, enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

#t=77″ target=”_blank”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4XFROzcs9k #t=77

Steve Allen Bio

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December 27, 1971…’The Sonny And Cher Show’ Debuts On CBS


December 27, 1971…’The Sonny And Cher Show’ Debuts On CBS

It was a 1971 guest spot on the ‘The Merv Griffin Show’ that convinced CBS programming head Fred Silverman that Sonny and Cher could be the network’s next big thing.

When ‘The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour’ debuted on CBS the first day of August in 1971, it was a trial run…a five-week summer replacement series but it was an immediate ratings hit.

CBS was looking to regain the young audience they lost when they canceled ‘The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour’ two years earlier – Sonny and Cher proved to be the show the network was looking for, and with good reason. The producers, Allan Blye and Chris Bearde and the writers were all Smothers Brothers’ alumni. Tommy Smothers once remarked, “I turned on the TV one night and there was our show. Only it starred Sonny and Cher!”

Based on the success of the summer show, ‘The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour’ was back on the air December 27, 1971, replacing ‘The Chicago Teddy Bears’ Friday nights at 8:00.

By the fall of 1972, in its Wednesday night at 8:00 time slot, the show became a consistent top-ten winner. Below is a funny outtake that shows us the kind of magnetism their personalities had in attracting audiences. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOfU5iwyL6E

I pissed my self laughing

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‘Howdy Doody’ Color Control Room…NBC Studio 3K, 1955

‘Howdy Doody’ Color Control Room…NBC Studio 3K, 1955

This is the only known photo of the control room for NBC’s first in-house color facility, Studio 3K, which went live the afternoon of September 12, 1955. The first colorcast from 3K was ‘The Howdy Doody Show’. NBC had color at The Colonial Theater and in Brooklyn, but this was the first color studio inside 30 Rock.

Studio 3K was created by combining television’s first working studio, 3H with radio studio 3F. Although the studio was bigger, the control room stayed the same size and as you can see, was packed full of gear. These days, 3K is one of two third floor studios occupied by MSNBC. The other is 3A. Thanks to our friend Gady Reinhold for this rarity. Enjoy and share! -Bobby Ellerbee

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