Posts in Category: Broadcast History

‘The Patsy’…Marconi Mark VIs and RCA TK60s In Action

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‘The Patsy’…Marconi Mark VIs and RCA TK60s In Action, Exclusive

From the 1964 Jerry Lewis, Paramount release, ‘The Patsy’, here is an edited clip you can only see here. This gives us a good look at two classic cameras in action. The Marconi Mark IV cameras in the first part are owned by KTLA which was then owned by Paramount as well.

‘The Ed Sullivan Show’ used Marconi Mark IVs, but in the movie version of the show, they are using RCA TK60s. Had they switched the cameras used in the shoots, they would have been historically correct, but hey…it’s only make believe right? By the way, Lloyd Thaxton is the “host”. Remember his shows? Enjoy and share![fb_vid id=”701688746535344″]
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History In The Making…The Start Of RCA’s World’s Fair Exhibit

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History In The Making…The Start Of RCA’s World’s Fair Exhibit

In these newly discovered photos. we see from left to right NBC President Lexon Lohr and RCA Chairman David Sarnoff signing the agreement to build the RCA Exhibition Building with Grover Whalen, who was President of the World’s Fair Corporation.

I don’t have a firm date for this, but suspect this is 1937. The photos are among the first that show us the original RCA Iconoscope studio cameras in NBC Studio 3H. These dark color cameras precede the RCA A500 Iconoscope cameras, which were painted silver.

The NYWF of 1939–1940 was the first exposition to be based on the future, with an opening slogan of “Dawn of a New Day”, and it allowed all visitors to take a look at “the world of tomorrow”.

Until just before the fair opened on April 30, 1939, Studio 3H was under the control of RCA and had been since it was converted from radio in 1935. In early April, 3H was put under the control of NBC Television in preparation for the network’s official launch which occurred on April 30, 1939 with live broadcasts of the fair’s opening with remarks from President Franklin Roosevelt. Enjoy and share!



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Introducing The RCA TKP 45 & TK 76 Prototypes

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Ultra Rare! Introducing The RCA TKP 45 & TK 76 Prototype…

The RCA TKP 45 was the first portable color camera without a backpack and debuted in 1974, two years before the TK 76 color ENG camera. At the 6:19 mark, you’ll see the TK 76 prototype that fortunately didn’t look anything at all like the final version.

This RCA sales tape includes footage from the field testing, some of which was at The Rose Parade. This was probably the first ever EFP or Electronic Field Production camera as it was mostly built for that and not Electronic News Gathering (ENG), but would work in either application. Our friend Lou Bazin was the principal RCA engineer on this, and many other RCA camera projects including the TK44, 45, 46 and 47. Enjoy and share!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNHGE5kDfL4

See the New Ultra Modern, Ultra Portable RCA Cameras!
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What A Team! Their First Teaming And How The Met!

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What A Team! Their First Teaming And How The Met!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdwGcC9jMIw
This may be the first candid photo of Jackie Gleason and Art Carney ever taken. Gleason looks very young here and this was probably taken during his tenure as host of the Dumont ‘Cavalcade Of Stars’.

At the link above is a clip that shows Jackie and Art in their first regular teaming. On the Dumont show, Gleason’s regular characters included Charlie Bratten, a lunchroom loudmouth who always spoiled the meal of the mild mannered Clem Finch, played by Carney. Gleason and Carney developed a good working chemistry, and Gleason recruited Carney to appear in other sketches, including of course, The Honeymooners.

In a way, Morey Amsterdam was responsible for this pair meeting. When Morey was the host of ‘Cavalcade Of Stars’ before Jackie’s arrival, he brought in Carney for a few sketches and the director, Joseph Cates (brother of Gil Cates), liked him. When Gleason took over the hosting job and wanted a new straight man for some of his sketches, Cates introduced him to Art Carney.

On both the radio and television versions of ‘The Morey Amsterdam Show’ (1948-50), Carney played a character known as Charlie The Doorman. Carney had seen Gleason in his first television work as the star of ‘The Life Of Riley’, That show only lasted part of one season but it was not canceled because of low ratings or Gleason’s desire to leave…it was a dispute between the producer and the sponsor. Now you know how one of comedy’s best teams came together. Enjoy and share!


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July 11, 1962…Telstar Beams First Transatlantic Television Signal

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July 11, 1962…Telstar Beams First Transatlantic Television Signal

Fifty two years ago today, Telstar went into operation as the world’s first telecommunications satellite. In this excellent video. hosted by NBC newsman Frank Blair, we get the whole story and at the 7:15 mark, Ed Hurlihe takes over the narration with a film of the first images transmitted. Enjoy and share!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHC5fkYch0Q

50 year anniversary of the World’s First Transatlantic Television Signal More information at http://telstar50.org
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July 10, 1950…’Your Hit Parade’ Comes To Television

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July 10, 1950…’Your Hit Parade’ Comes To Television

The video here is not the first episode, but is the earliest known look at the show available. When this clip starts, you’ll see a young dancer featured in the song ‘Dinah’…that’s Bob Fosse.

The show started on the NBC Radio Red Network in 1935 and came to NBC television viewers on Saturday nights from 10:30 till 11, from July 1950 till the summer of 1957. The show was in color from ’54 till ’57 when NBC canceled it.

In the fall of ’57, the show ran on CBS for a year, but rock and roll had put a big dent in the show’s popularity and that was it’s last season. Enjoy and share!

http://youtu.be/hVCVHmVDEYc?t=7m51sDorothy Collins, Snooky Lanson, Eileen Wilson, Raymond Scott and the Lucky Strike Orchestra. It’s all here from 1951. Bob Fosse was a featured dancer. Norman…
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Did You Know A Cameraman Has The Most Emmy Nominations? It’s true!

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Did You Know A Cameraman Has The Most Emmy Nominations?

It’s true! His name is Hector Rameriz and he is considered one of the most successful artists in Emmys history. His career spans four decades and yesterday, he received his 72nd nomination for an episode of ‘Dancing with the Stars’, maintaining his record as the most nominated individual in Emmy history. He’s followed by Sheila Nevins, the president of HBO Documentary Films, who now has 67 nominations.

The Emmy Legends video interview is below and at the 45:00 mark, Hector talks about his work on ‘The Carol Burnett Show’ and tells us about the day Carol and Harvey Korman did the famous ‘Gone With The Wind’ parody. They had to stop for a half hour to get all the laughs out of their systems! Good luck Hector! Enjoy and share!

http://youtu.be/HTG3Way7w9Q?t=45mFull interview at http://www.emmytvlegends.org/interviews/people/hector-ramirez
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My RCA TK42

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My RCA TK42

Here is another of the professionally shot portraits of a few of my cameras. This TK42 is forty seven years old and was built in 1967. By my count, there are only about 20 of these that have survived.

RCA built the TK42 from 1965 till 1969. Of the 376 made, only 6 were sold to networks and that network was the Canadian Broadcasting Company. The other 370 went to local stations in the US. When the internal lens sticking (overheating) problem became evident, RCA came out with the external lens TK43 in 1967 and built 93 of them between then and 1970. Enjoy and share.


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The RCA TK47, Rush And A Beautiful Camera Op!

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The RCA TK47, Rush And A Beautiful Camera Op!

From 1987, here’s the Rush song ‘Time Stands Still’…but that’s the only thing still here. This opens in a television studio with every man’s blond fantasy behind the RCA TK47. You’ll see a lot of old video tricks in this, but they were new then and very overused. Take your Dramamine and click on the video.

By the way, the TK47s in the US were blue and beige, but I think RCA painted the export cameras different colors as I have seen red ones in Europe and this may have been done in Canada. Thanks to our friend in Argentina, Eduardo Vilela for sharing this.

#t=85″ target=”_blank”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMSFqXGZ5TQ #t=85

Amazon: http://bit.ly/Rush2112SDE_Web Music video by Rush performing Time Stands Still. (C) 1987 The Island Def Jam Music Group
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Quite Possibly, The Oldest Surviving Television Set Commercial…

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Quite Possibly, The Oldest Surviving Television Set Commercial…

This may also be the first time Wally Cox appears as a regular on a television show. The clip is from a short lived Dumont Network show called ‘The School House’ which ran from January to April of 1949 on Tuesday nights at 9.

At the time, I think this Dumont set was one of the largest screen sizes available at 20 inches. RCA and others had mostly 12 and 16 inch screens. Enjoy and share!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9525dRYiKM

A Classic TV commercial for a Television set produced by DuMont Laboratories, founded by Allen B Du Mont. His company also started the DuMont Television Netw…
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‘I Love Lucy’…Warming Up The Audience

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‘I Love Lucy’…Warming Up The Audience

Here is a new shot of Desi doing the audience warm up for the show. Part of his routine was to tell the audience not to worry about having their view blocked by the cameras, because “they would never be in the way”. At that point, all three dollied in for a tight shot and no one could see Desi. This always got a laugh.

There was a great video of this, but like so many other clips, it has disappeared from the internet. By the way, these Mitchell cameras are fitted with 1000 foot magazines which was good for about eleven minutes. Enjoy and share!


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Desilu…In The Beginning There Was 6633 Romaine Street

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Desilu…In The Beginning There Was 6633 Romaine Street

During the first few years of ‘I Love Lucy’, Desilu Productions rented space at General Service Studios, which is now the Hollywood Center Studios, on Santa Monica Boulevard and North Las Palmas Avenue.

Desilu used Stage Two which was named Desilu Playhouse and a special entrance was created at 6633 Romaine Street on the south side of the lot allowing entrance into the Desilu Playhouse.

The second photo shows Desi Arnaz on the steps to the Culver office. During its heyday, Desilu Productions owned one of the largest and most complete studio facilities in the world for the production of television, motion picture, industrial and commercial films.

Between 1957 and 1967, it was the only film producer in the
industry that operated and maintained three separate studios, —
Desilu Gower, Desilu Culver, and Desilu Cahuenga — each
possessing certain distinct physical features designed to meet
every possible production requirement.

The three studios included a total of 36 soundstages and 500
offices situated on 63 acres of land, with building and stage space
comprising approximately 1.2 million square feet. They owned four more studios than MGM and eleven more and Fox.

Normal personnel consisted of approximately 400 employees, with
this figure rising to 1,800 at maximum production level. With the
exception of regular staff members, Desilu engaged most of its
creative, artistic and production personnel on a show-by-show
basis when necessary. Because of Desilu’s long-standing
industry-wide record of fine labor-management standards, it
consistently drew to its productions the cream of Hollywood’s
creative and production talent.



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The World’s First And Only Camera Limousine

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The World’s First And Only Camera Limousine

I think this Cadillac limousine was first used on President Eisenhower’s inauguration on January 30, 1953. It was NBC’s mobile unit purchased to use in the parade, just ahead of the President’s car. I think the microwave signal from the car was shot to an NBC truck that was nearby and was sent on to the tower pickup from there.

There probably was not pool coverage of the parade route, but if there was, I’m pretty sure this was a proprietary vantage point for them. Enjoy and share.


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The ODD History Of The TWO El Capitan Theaters in Hollywood….

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The ODD History Of The TWO El Capitan Theaters in Hollywood….

The El Capitan Theater…a very familiar name to movie and TV fans, but did you know there were two El Capitan Theaters in Los Angeles? There were, and the only thing they had in common was their famous name.

In this photo, you see the home of ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’ next to the original El Capitan and the show comes from what was once the Hollywood Masonic Temple. This is now called The El Capitan Entertainment Center at 6838 Hollywood Blvd. This movie theater is the site of the original El Capitan which opened in 1926 and this has never been a radio or television studio. Both are now owned by Disney.

You probably know the “other” El Capitan better as The Hollywood Palace at 1735 Vine Street. It’s now called The Avalon Theater, but when it was built in 1927 it was the Hollywood Playhouse.

The original El Capitan location on Hollywood Blvd., started as a legitimate theater and presented live plays, with over 120 productions including such legends as Clark Gable and Joan Fontaine. By the late 1930s, business was faltering. When Orson Welles was unable to locate a theatre owner willing to risk screening Citizen Kane, he turned to El Capitan, and in 1941, Citizen Kane had its world premiere there.

It closed for renovation and re opened on March 18, 1942 as the Hollywood Paramount Theatre. Its inaugural film presentation was Cecil B. DeMille’s Technicolor feature ‘Reap the Wild Wind’, starring Ray Milland, John Wayne, Paulette Goddard and Raymond Massey.

Meanwhile at 1735 Vine Street, that property was renamed The El Capitan Theatre in 1943, and was used for a long-running live burlesque variety show called Ken Murray’s Blackouts. CBS Radio also did shows from here including ‘My Favorite Husband’ starring Lucille Ball.

In the 1950s, still under the name of El Capitan, the theatre became a television studio, and it was from a set on its stage that Richard Nixon delivered his famous “Checkers speech” on September 23, 1952. This event is often mistakenly said to have taken place at the El Capitan Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard.

The Vine Street El Captain Theater was also home to some episodes of NBC’s ‘Colgate Comedy Hour’, and ‘This is Your Life’. In 1963, ABC bought the theater and named it The Jerry Lewis Theater after the show it was to be home to, but the Lewis show died after just 13 weeks. Within a few months, ABC had created ‘The Hollywood Palace’ show and renamed the theater yet again.

There are many similar situations in New York and the one that comes to mind is The Ziegfeld Theater, but that’s another story for another day. Enjoy and share this!



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The 14 City NBC Television Network…1949

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The 14 City NBC Television Network…1949

In this clip from the ‘Howdy Doody Show’, we get some interesting information on the status of NBC’s coverage of the country via the AT&T links for live television. About two thirds of the way in, and at the very end, we get confirmation that this show was kinescoped and mailed to most of the other major metro areas not covered by the growing network.

My home town of Atlanta was added on October 4, 1950, just 27 days before I was born.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jylFlfG9bWg

40’s TV: An NBC promo from 1949, promoting the NBC Television itself. When this aired, TV was so young that many parts of the USA still didn’t get the networ…
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The Early History Of NBC Television News

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The Early History Of NBC Television News

This 60th Anniversary video from 2008 starts with some of the only surviving footage of television’s first network news show, ‘The NBC Television Newsreel’ with the voice of Paul Alley. On that show, there was no on-camera anchor, only Alley narrating silent film clips provided by Fox Movietone News. The show aired Monday, Wednesday and Friday nights from 7:30 till 7:45. It began February 15, 1948, but within a few months, the name was changed to ‘The Camel Newsreel Theater’ when Camel cigarettes became the sponsor.

It was actually Camel, and the Esty Advertising Agency (who handled the account) that helped push the development of a nightly news show into being. Camel wanted a five night a week show with a live anchor, so, Esty created a competition between NBC and CBS for the lucrative Camel account. CBS got a wake up call, but NBC got the nod and thus was born ‘The Camel News Caravan’ with John Cameron Swayze as host.

In today’s next post, I’ll share some interesting background I’ve recently discovered on ‘The Camel News Caravan’, it’s host and his wig. Enjoy and share!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFvTrGDTCYU

Recorded from nightly news Insight from John Cameron Swayze to Brian Williams
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You Mean They Weren’t Driving A Real Car To California?

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You Mean They Weren’t Driving A Real Car To California?

From Season 4, Episode 12, here’s the cast of ‘I Love Lucy’ setting out for California on January 10, 1955…sort of.

The clip is not great, but it shows us how this looked when it was framed and shot. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73aWPgOL-9U

The car is a new Pontiac convertible. In case you did not know, “California, Here I Come” was written for the 1921 Broadway musical ‘Bombo’, starring Al Jolson. The song was written by Buddy DeSylva and Joseph Meyer, with Jolson often listed as a co-author. Jolson recorded the song in 1924 and it was an instant hit. Enjoy and share!


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Classic! The Marconi Mark IV

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Classic! The Marconi Mark IV

Here is another of the beautiful portraits Parker Smith took of my camera collection. This is one of my favorites. In the US, there are only 6 of the Marconi Mark IVs known to have survived…this is one of them. Please click to enlarge for a clearer image.

Unfortunately, none of the Ed Sullivan Mark IV cameras which shot The Beatles survived. That I know of, none of the CBS New York or Television City Mark IVs made it either. I repainted this camera and dressed it to honor the Sullivan, Beatle cameras.

This was Marconi’s answer to the RCA TK60 and both made great pictures with their 4 1/2 inch Image Orthicon tubes. Enjoy and share.


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Lawrence Welk Trades Places With The Cameraman…1978

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Lawrence Welk Trades Places With The Cameraman…1978

The show was an ABC heavyweight from ’55 till ’71 when it was canceled, but started on a syndicated basis the next year. The 77-79 seasons were shot at CBS Televison City. Here’s Lawrence behind a Norelco PC60 with it’s “dual exhausts”. Enjoy and share!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdX8V1zRjLg

Cissy dances with the camera man! (1978)
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Lawrence Welk…Television’s First “Stereo” Sound Show

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Lawrence Welk…Television’s First “Stereo” Sound Show

Twenty years before television was able to broadcast high quality stereo sound, ABC had broadcast ‘The Lawrence Welk Show’ in “stereo”…sort of.

The year was 1958. Now, due to the fact that stereophonic television had not yet been invented you would think this was impossible, but if you have your own radio and television networks…you can do it. I’m surprised NBC or CBS didn’t beat them to it.

Here’s the way it worked…ABC simulcast the show on its radio and TV network, with the TV side airing one mono channel, and the radio side airing the other; viewers would tune in both the TV and the radio to achieve the stereophonic effect. Each channel miked the instruments differently. At the link is a Billboard Magazine advertisement of the process. #v=onepage&q&f=false” target=”_blank”>http://books.google.com/books?id=-QoEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA23 #v=onepage&q&f=false

The show debuted on ABC Television on July 2, 1955 and this photo is from a few weeks after the network debut. It was taken on the first night at the show’s new home at ABC Studios at Prospect and Talmadge in Hollywood.

Welk’s shows actually started in 1951 on KTLA and originated from the Aragon Ballroom at Venice Beach. In 1954, it moved to The Hollywood Palladium where the first few ABC shows were done. By 1957, the show was so popular, it overwhelmed the perennial star of Saturday nights, Sid Caesar. Enjoy and share!


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Another Beauty Shot…Norelco PC60

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Another Beauty Shot…Norelco PC60

Here is another of Parker Smith’s portraits of a few of my cameras. This PC60 began life at CBS Studio 52 in New York, just around the corner from Studio 50, The Ed Sullivan Theater. It later went to CBS Washington and was used on the White House mobile unit. Enjoy and share!


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Preparing For One Of Television’s Most Memorable Scenes…

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Preparing For One Of Television’s Most Memorable Scenes…

We all know what happens next, but here is a rare classic shot of Lucy having her “flaming nose” applied by Hal King. Behind Lucille Ball is Jess Oppenheimer and on the right is Director of Photography Carl Freund. Enjoy and share!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyDvc8tsd_0


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You Mean Julia Was Not Alone In That Kitchen?

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You Mean Julia Was Not Alone In That Kitchen?

Obviously not! Got a caption for this? Enjoy and share!


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I Told You Mitch Miller Was A Joker…Can You Spot The Joke Here?

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I Told You Mitch Miller Was A Joker…Can You Spot The Joke Here?

As you watch, you’re in for a surprise as there is “a joker in the deck”, but not a word was ever said about it on the show. Thanks to Kevin Vahey for this bit of fun. (The joker, Johnny Carson, shows up at 2:53, 3:28 and 4:11)

http://youtu.be/EZ5GwzvkN-k?t=2m23sSing Along With Mitch (4 of 4)
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Making Movies In 1899…Lubin Studios, Philadelphia

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Making Movies In 1899…Lubin Studios, Philadelphia

Before there was Hollywood, there was Betzwood. Before there were film moguls and studio lots in California, Siegmund Lubin was doing it in Pennsylvania.

Lubin was originally an optical and photography expert in Philadelphia but he became intrigued with Thomas Edison’s motion picture camera and saw the potential in selling similar such equipment as well as the making of films. Lubin constructed his own combined camera/projector he called a “Cineograph” and his lower price and marketing know-how brought reasonable success.

In 1897 Lubin began making films for commercial release. Certain his business could prosper, the following year he rented low-cost space on the roof of a building in Philadelphia’s business district (seen here). He exhibited his new equipment at the 1899 National Export Exposition in Philadelphia and the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York.

The insatiable appetite of the American public for motion picture entertainment saw Lubin’s film company undergo enormous growth. Aided by French-born writer and poet Hugh Antoine d’Arcy, who served as the studio’s publicity manager, in 1910 Siegmund Lubin built a state of the art studio on the corner of Indiana avenue and Twentieth Street in Philadelphia that became known as “Lubinville.”

At the time, it was one of the most modern studios in the world, complete with a huge artificially lit stage, editing rooms, laboratories, and workshops. The facility allowed several film productions to be undertaken simultaneously. The Lubin Manufacturing Company expanded production beyond Philadelphia, with facilities in Jacksonville, Florida, Los Angeles, and then in Coronado, California.

In 1912, Lubin purchased a 350-acre estate in Betzwood in the northwest outskirts of Philadelphia and converted the property into a studio and film lot. This was to be one of the first real film lots in history and is shown here complete with it’s “western set”. Enjoy and share!



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A Rare Bit Of Film History…Making Movies With Sound

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A Rare Bit Of Film History…Making Movies With Sound

‘Show Girl in Hollywood’ was released in April of 1930 and is one of the first sound films made. Fortunately it includes in it’s story line a bit about how these films were made.

As you will see in this rare clip, condenser mics are hung from the rafters and there are multiple cameras shooting simultaneously from soundproofed booths. The first look at the cameras comes at :43 and at 1:25, we go inside the booth and hear the whur of the camera. There are several more camera shots, but at 3:09 and 3:11 we get a look at the audio mixing board and the lathe cutting the disc the sound was recorded on.

Cameras were noisy, so a soundproofed cabinet was used to isolate the loud equipment from the actors, at the expense of a drastic reduction in the ability to move the camera. For a time, multiple-camera shooting was used to compensate for the loss of mobility and innovative studio technicians could often find ways to liberate the camera for particular shots.

The necessity of staying within range of still microphones meant that actors also often had to limit their movements unnaturally. ‘Show Girl in Hollywood’, from First National Pictures (which Warner Bros. had taken control of thanks to its profitable adventure into sound), gives us one of the best ever behind-the-scenes look at some of the techniques involved in shooting early talkies.

Several of the fundamental problems caused by the transition to sound were soon solved with new camera casings, known as “blimps”, designed to suppress noise and boom microphones that could be held just out of frame and moved with the actors.

With sound came a new, strict standard of 24 fps. Sound also forced the abandonment of the noisy arc lights used for filming in studio interiors. The switch to quiet incandescent illumination in turn required a switch to more expensive film stock. The sensitivity of the new panchromatic film delivered superior image tonal quality and gave directors the freedom to shoot scenes at lower light levels than was previously practical.

Thanks to our friend, NBC audio legend Joel Spector for sharing this with us! Enjoy and share!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oafgeA41QTc

Alice White performs “I’ve Got My Eyes On You” in the 1930 musical Show Girl In Hollywood – Learn more about Alice at http://www.alicewhite.org
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RCA Catalog Cover? Nope! Better…

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RCA Catalog Cover? Nope! Better…

A few months ago, well known Atlanta photographer Parker Smith came to my house and shot my camera collection all day long. This is one of those shots…a beautiful portrait of my RCA TK60, but this is not just one shot! It’s a composite of about a dozen shots. This actually looks much better and sharper if you click on it for the bigger view.

He would relight each shot and later combine them with Photoshop to merge the images into one. I think RCA would be jealous. Thank you Parker! More to come soon!


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‘Seinfeld’ At 25…Yada, Yada, Yada…

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‘Seinfeld’ At 25…Yada, Yada, Yada…

Twenty five years ago yesterday, July 5, 1989, the show premiered as ‘The Seinfeld Chronicles’ as a one time test on NBC. After it aired, a pickup by NBC did not seem likely and the show was offered to Fox, which declined to pick it up. Rick Ludwin, head of late night and special events for NBC, however, diverted money from his budget by canceling a Bob Hope television special, and the next four episodes were filmed.

Those four episodes aired May 31 June 21, 1990 together with the pilot constituted the first season. These four episodes were highly rated as they followed ‘Cheers’ on Thursdays at 9:30 p.m., and the series was finally picked up.

NBC ordered 13 more episodes and the second season aired January to June of 1991 but only 12 episode ran as the scheduled premiere of January 16, 1991 was bumped due to the outbreak of the Persian Gulf war.

Larry David believed that he and Jerry Seinfeld had no more stories to tell, and advised his partner to turn down the order, but Seinfeld agreed to the additional episodes. For the first three seasons, Jerry’s stand-up comedy act would bookend an episode, even functioning as cut scenes during the show.

Here’s fun few minutes of outtakes from the show that take us on location and into the studio at CBS Studio Center in LA. Enjoy and share.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNKdv_JyzyQ

This is a video compilation of behind the scenes footage taken from NBC’s Seinfeld set. Includes a variety of raw footage, bloopers, a cast introduction, and…
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The First ‘I Love Lucy’…The Photo And The Video

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The First ‘I Love Lucy’…The Photo And The Video

Although “Lucy Thinks Ricky Is Trying To Murder Her” was the fourth episode to air, it was actually the first one shot. The film date was September 8, 1951 and the air date, November 5.

This photo was probably taken on September 7, a day before dress rehearsal. Being the first show, a lot of initial blocking was needed as was wardrobe planning. They wanted to do the show without stopping and this meant Lucy and others had to wear layers of clothes for quick changes.

In this episode, Lucy only has one costume, but in the second and third, there are several changes which she wore in layers, but that stopped after the third episode and they would stop for changes. Pickups were few and usually done at the end.

Here is the video link queued to the start of this scene. Notice Ricky is now in a tie with no sweater vest. Enjoy and share!

http://youtu.be/PVpjdGl2VRc?t=8m46s


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Nice Shot NBC Brooklyn Studios

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Nice Shot NBC Brooklyn Studios

Jodie Peeler sent me this recently and as I studied the photo of my favorite cameras in action, I began to try to fix the location. The donut box on the crane mounted TK41 told me this was New York…they were the only NBC crews to do this. CBS New York did this too with their TK30s. Must be something in the water?

The dead giveaway was the cabling on the sound boom. Notice it goes up. NBC Brooklyn was the only place that had overhead cable guides for the booms. As I understand it, there were big free swinging arms mounted under the lights that were rigged to keep the audio cables off the floor.

The beauty of these two huge studios was their size. Cameras were able to move in here like on movie sets and producers and crews took full advantage of it with lots of sweeping shots. There were at least two Houston Fearless 30B cranes (shown here), several Panoram dollies (lower camera) and lots of ped cameras.

The camera cables were too heavy to use the overhead system, but in order to get as much cable off the floor as possible, the audio was flown. Just off the top of my head, I think Studio A was 12,000 square feet and B was 10,000. Any guesses on what show or special this if from? Enjoy and share!


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