Posts in Category: Broadcast History

Inside NBC Sports HQ In Stamford

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Inside NBC Sports HQ In Stamford

Here’s a local article on Olympic coverage and the new facility. Thanks to Kevin Vahey, in Stochi who’s been doing excellent camera work on hockey coverage for sending this.

Dan Haar: NBC’s Stamford ‘Olympics Factory’ A Non-Stop Machine

STAMFORD — Everything seems relaxed in a control room deep inside the massive NBC Sports Group headquarters in Stamford, where nine people, mostly men in their 20s and 30s, monitor video feeds from the Sochi Olympics , their chatter subdued.
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The Birth Of ‘Tonight!’

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The Birth Of ‘Tonight!’

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8AYUfBt1dE

When ‘Broadway Open House’ left the air in August of ’51, late night television got put on the back burner as NBC’s Pat Weaver was busy putting together ‘The Today Show’, which debuted in January of 1952. After a year or so of intense focus on the early mornings, Pat began to think about late nights again and was interested in a west coaster that had recently shown up for some extended club dates and radio work in NYC. This was of course Steve Allen, and Weaver tested the water by giving Allen a half hour of late night air time on NBC’s local station, WNBT near the end of 1953. Around a year later, Weaver moved the show to The Hudson Theater, expanded it to an hour and forty five minutes and put it on the network live weeknights at 11:15. It debuted on September 27, 1954 as ‘Tonight!’ (with and exclamation mark that was soon deleted). ‘Tonight’ did everything it could to fill the time: There were games, interviews, sketches, songs…and for a brief time, even a nightly (real, not fake) news round-up. Steve played piano, chatted with eccentric guests and audience members and put up with stunts which he sometimes described as “plots by the staff against my life.” Gene Rayburn was the announcer and sidekick, Skitch Henderson led the band and the regulars included singers Steve Lawrence, Eydie Gorme, Pat Marshall and Andy Williams. Most of the time, Tonight came from the Hudson Theater in New York, but in the fall of 1955 the show visited Hollywood. For eight weeks that year, ‘Tonight’ emanated from KNBT where Steve was filming the title role in the movie, “The Benny Goodman Story”. Most performers would consider it a tiring full-time job to either host a late night show five evenings a week or to star in a major motion picture. Somehow, without missing a day on either, Allen managed to do both…though right after, he did take his first two-week vacation from ‘Tonight’, turning the festivities over to guest host Ernie Kovacs. In June of 1956, NBC added more to Allen’s duties giving him a prime-time Sunday night series, competing on NBC against Ed Sullivan’s popular CBS program. The burden became too great and soon after, the Monday and Tuesday night broadcasts of ‘Tonight’ were turned over to a roster of ever-changing guest hosts, including Ernie Kovacs, Jack Paar, Henry Morgan, Bill Cullen, Gene Rayburn, Rudy Vallee, Tony Randall, cartoonist Al Capp and even, from the old Broadway Open House, Morey Amsterdam and Jerry Lester. Allen hosted the rest of the week, until the end of January, 1957 when Allen decided to give up the late night show. The entire thing was replaced by a famous disaster — a multi-hosted “magazine” show called ‘Tonight: America After Dark’. When that didn’t work, they began the search for another single host which resulted in the Jack Paar era of ‘Tonight’. The Steve Allen years remain legendary but largely lost. Fortunately, video of the shows first ever moments have survived and are at the link at the top.


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NBC’s First Live Coast To Coast Color Spectacular!

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GREAT! NBC’s First Live Coast To Coast Color Spectacular!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yo0MEhjr7Xo
On Sept. 12, 1954 NBC broadcast their first live coast to coast color spectacular. The 90 minute show was produced by Max Liebman and starred Betty Hutton. At the link is a black and white kinescope, but there’s no mistaking as you look at the image that there is a “chroma layer” to the image. Following the end credits, Steve Allen has a very interesting live commentary from the set on the production, and reveals that with no control room in the new facility, the show was produced from a truck outside of NBC Brooklyn. There is a TK41 in that segment. At 1:10:13, Hutton does a curtain call and speaks to the television and live audience and sings out into the credits. At 1:14 Steve Allen’s comments come in followed by Don Pardo’s billboards of upcoming programs. Thanks to our friend Steve Dichter in LA for this information and the TV Guide page below that describes this event as “opening night of a new television era”. The spectaculars were the creation of none other than NBC’s Pat Weaver. At the time, the few color television sets available had 15″ screens, but a few had the new 19″ screen. 99% of viewers saw this on their larger screen black and white sets. Enjoy!


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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 4

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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 4

As you will see in the post below this one, Ed Sullivan had a largely unknown soft side. To most, he seemed temperamental and easily angered and frankly, the best advice for staff and crew was to keep your distance. As stage manager, Eddie Brinkmann was not able to do that as he was the key man Ed dealt with on stage. In the coming days, you will see several “special” letters from Ed to Eddie including this one. It is the first of the “kiss and make up” notes Brinkmann would get after being fired and he was fired many times, but is the only staff member to make it from start to finish with Ed…from 1948 till 1971. Thanks to Brinkmann’s granddaughter Dee Wexler for sharing his papers with us.


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A Side Of Ed Sullivan We Never Knew…

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A Side Of Ed Sullivan We Never Knew…

In the photo below is Barbara Smith Forster with Ed and his two grandsons. They are on stage at the Deuville Hotel in Miami where the Beatles performed live 50 years ago on Sunday, February 16, 1964. Barbara was secretary to the show’s producer, and Sullivan son-in-law Bob Precht. I’ve had the good fortune to have some extended conversations with Barbara and other Sullivan staffers over the past month and that has given me a lot of new insights into the show and it’s people, including Mr. Sullivan. It’s well known that Ed had an explosive temper and was by all accounts, “a bit gruff”, however…there were things he did in private that most never knew about. For instance, the Tessie O’Shea appearance on the Beatles debut show. Along with the fab four and Georgia Brown of ‘Oliver’, Tessie shares top billing on that famous marquee, but why? The truth is, Sullivan had a soft spot for some of the old vaudeville and Broadway people that were having a hard time. Occasionally, like in Tessie’s case, he would book them on the show himself and surprise the talent scheduling people. At times, he would encourage night club owners he knew in the northeast to offer bookings to some, but Mr. Sullivan would also secretly give many of them a “loan”. For those of us lucky enough to have grown up with ‘The Ed Sullivan Show’ as a part of our lives, we know that this was one of a kind! Nothing that comes after it can ever capture the uniqueness, stature and iconic nature of one of television’s true landmarks.


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‘Broadway Open House’…The Start Of Late Night Television

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‘Broadway Open House’…The Start Of Late Night Television

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnkCg5wnBOo
Above, a link to some of the only surviving video of the show, and below is Jerry Lester on stage in the brand new NBC Studio 6A, hosting network television’s first late-night comedy-variety series. It was telecast live on NBC from May 29, 1950 to August 24, 1951, airing weeknights from 11 to midnight.

A dozen years before Johnny Carson took over the reins of ‘The Tonight Show’, and long before Jack Paar and Steve Allen redefined the genre, NBC began an experiment in programming that has, in one incarnation or another, lasted over six decades…the late night variety show. The show came about due to the visionary work of Sylvester `Pat’ Weaver (father of actress Sigourney Weaver and brother to comedian `Doodles’ Weaver) who began his career as a radio producer in the 1930s (Fred Allen’s Town Hall Tonight), and who eventually became head of programming for the NBC radio network. In 1949 he was brought over to the struggling NBC TV network in hopes that he could break the CBS’s stranglehold on the ratings. One of the first innovations that Weaver introduced came in the form of ‘Broadway Open House’. The show was supposed to be hosted by comic Don “Creesh” Hornsby, but Hornsby died suddenly two weeks before the show premiered. In a last minute bit of substitution, Morey Amsterdam, who already had hosted a variety show on the Dumont network, covered Monday and Friday nights and a brash young comedian named Jerry Lester did Tues-Weds-Thurs.

Lester had previously been the host of DuMont’s Cavalcade of Stars, but walked off the show earlier in the year. Filling in for AWOL Lester was a young comedian named Jackie Gleason, who moved the show to CBS and became a mainstay of TV for 20 years. Amsterdam would leave ‘Broadway Open House’ quickly, leaving Lester to cover five nights a week. Lester was the master of “low comedy”, and his antics were what you might expect from a baggy pants vaudeville comedian of another era. Pratt falls, rapid fire deliveries (so if one joke fails, the next is already on the way), and juvenile antics. He was, however, exactly what the late night show needed. Someone was lively, who was able to ad lib, and someone who could do an hour a night.

Lester padded his show with regulars,including dancer Ray Malone, accordionist Milton DeLugg, announcer Wayne Howell and vocalists Jane Harvey, Andy Roberts and David Street. The show began in May of 1950, but in mid-June Lester hired buxom Jennie Lewis for a bit part, where she was to read some poetry, act dumb, and give the show some eye-candy. Lester named her`Dagmar’, and smirked about her `hidden talents’. Dagmar was an immediate success, and became a regular member of the cast and thus was born “the dumb blonde” stereotype.

By the end of the year, Dagmar was a sensation. American TV’s first sex symbol. Her popularity grew to the point where she was getting more fan mail than the host, Jerry Lester. In 1951, out of frustration, Lester quit the show. Dagmar went on to host it briefly, before the show was canceled later in the year.

`Pat’ Weaver, who created this genre of late night programming, would end up creating the venerable Today Show for NBC, and pioneered the practice of networks (instead of sponsors) owning a show, and selling advertisements. He would soon also meet an entertainer named Steve Allen, but more on that tomorrow!


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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 3

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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 3

Written by Sullivan himself, here is the 1953 ‘Variety’ 5th Anniversary article. In his own words, Ed tells us how the show came to be, but near the end, Sullivan talks about hosting a 1947 charity event that he says was the first CBS remote and swears that he did not know that both he (as MC) and the event was on television. This is a high resolution scan but if you have trouble reading it, hold the Control button and hit the + button a couple of times. Control and – takes you back to regular screen size.


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THIS Is Where Late Night Television Starts…

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THIS Is Where Late Night Television Starts…

The man circled in this photo is Don “Creesh” Hornsby. NBC’s Pat Weaver choose Hornsby to host network television’s first late night show called ‘Broadway Open House’. In the book “Fight for Tonight,” by Ronald L. Smith, he writes: “Hornsby was the ‘wild and crazy’ man of his day, a cross between Steve Martin and Pee-Wee Herman. He had a penchant for put-on humor and odd slapstick stunts. His antics included magic, piano playing, squirting customers with dry ice and shouting “Creesh!” as he magically pulled brassieres out of women’s blouses or cranked up a machine on stage that spewed potato chips.”

Hornsby’s local daytime TV show in California had a kind of Pee-Wee’s Playhouse set. There was a lot of thrift-shop garbage strewn around and in moments of hysteria, Hornsby would start talking to a large prop grandfather’s clock – which would talk back. Bob Hope was a fan of the wild comedian, calling him “a bright new talent, a guy who is going to have a big future.” I think Hope is the person that told Pat Weaver about him after Pat mentioned he wanted to do a late show. NBC signed him up to a five-year contract.

Everything was going well for young Creesh. He was 26, moving to New York with his wife and kids, getting ready for his debut as the host of a late night TV show, but sadly, here is the May 22, 1950 headline from Variety: “Don ‘Creesh’ Hornsby Dies of Polio Attack On Eve of TV Preem.” The premiere of the show was postponed a week, to May 29th. Guest hosts were called in and Dumont’s Morey Amsterdam hosted ‘Broadway Open House’ on Mondays and Tuesdays and Wednesday – Friday was handled by Jerry Lester. Lester had recently walked off Dumont’s ‘Cavalcade Of Stars’…he had hosted the show in it’s second year, but when he left, a comedian that was totally new to television took over. Lester’s replacement was Jackie Gleason.


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All Hail Caesar!

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All Hail Caesar!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNbT9Lf9xZo
Sadly, the father of television sketch comedy is no longer with us.
From 1950 till 1957, Sid Caesar was one of the biggest names in television. The link above is to one of my favorite sketches from the show. Below left, is Sid’s first television project, ‘The Admiral Broadway Revue’ in 1949. In the middle is a photo from ‘Your Show Of Shows’ which ran from ’50 till ’54 when Imogene Coca went on her own. Sid replaced her with Nanette Fabre and returned to the NBC airwaves with ‘Caesar’s Hour’ (right) which ran from ’54 till ’57. Some of the biggest writers ever got their start with Caesar including Mel, Brooks, Carl Reiner, Neil Simon, Woody Allen, Larry Gelbart and others.




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Dave Puts An Audience Member Behind A Camera…

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Dave Puts An Audience Member Behind A Camera…

It’s been a year since I first posted this, but now seems a good time for us to take another look. NBC’s ‘Late Night With David Letterman’ debuted at 12:30 AM, Monday, February 1, 1982 replacing Tom Snyder’s ‘Tomorrow’ show. This clip is from his second night on the air. At the end of the first week, the ratings were 30% better than Snyder’s. The night after this clip, baseball great Hank Arron was on and after his time with Dave, a camera followed him backstage where Marv Albert did a “post interview, interview” to see how it had gone, just like a post game interview.

http://youtu.be/NraxSgAPKXQ2.2.82 2nd Late Night show. opening segment.
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Remembering Shirley Temple…

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Remembering Shirley Temple…

There is just too much to say except Thank You! She made more than one generation smile. It just so happens that this photo is one she autographed to Sullivan stage manager Eddie Brinkmann on one of her many appearances on the show.


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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 2

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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 2

This is a rare run sheet for ‘The Ed Sullivan Show’ for St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 1957 which explains a the Irish theme. In green is the autograph of Dublin’s Lord Mayor Robert Briscoe. Yogi Bera was at the theater that night and after learning that Briscoe was the first Jewish mayor of Dublin was head to exclaim “Only In America”! Robert Mitchum was there that night to promote his new movie with Deborah Kerr, “Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison” and as you can see, actually sang a couple of times including a number with the Ames Brothers. Jo, Jac and Joni are an English musical comedy act. Along the way, we’ll see other run sheets, but this is the only clean one…all the others are filled with notes and last minute changes. Thanks again do Eddie’s granddaughter Dee Wexler for sharing these rare momentous with us.


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Another Look At The Sullivan Theater Balcony

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Another Look At The Sullivan Theater Balcony

Thanks to Dennis Degan, we got some new information on the balcony at Studio 50. In the comment section, I am posting an enormous photo of the balcony as it looked in 1927 and in that, you can see how big it was. I said yesterday that I thought the Letterman remodeling had removed the first tier, but as it turns out, that is backward. As you can see in the color photo, the upper balcony is now closed in and that space is used as a set. The photo on the left is from the late 80s and shows another view of the balcony and an awful lighting grid over part of the stage. There was a period of years after CBS sold the theater that it was used as a general production house. CBS had taken their equipment out including the lighting grids when they sold it. Hopefully we’ll have some photos of the mystery space soon.



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Ever See This Before? Me Either!

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Ever See This Before? Me Either!

I acquired this and the other two very rare photos in the comment section Sunday afternoon, just hours before I saw them on the 8 o’clock CBS concert special. This black Mylar set was the first one up for the Beatles Saturday morning rehearsal. You can see Neal Aspinall standing in for George Harrison, so this was at the very start of the day as Aspinall was soon relieved of stand in duty by Vince Calandra. On seeing this, Sullivan immediately nixed Bill Bohnert’s set saying, “this is the Ed Sullivan show, not the Beatles show”.


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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 1

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An Exclusive From The Eddie Brinkmann Archives…Part 1

How’s this for a resume? To help you get to know more about Eddie’s amazing carrier, that covers Broadway and television, I thought we should start with is resume. The first page (left) and half covers a lot of big names in theater, but be sure and take a look at the bottom of page two (middle) and all of page 3. The shows he stage managed are some of the biggest in television. Although he worked with Sullivan 23 years, that was usually just on Saturday and Sundays. The rest of the week he was stage managing other shows, including Jackie Gleason, The Ed Murrow Show, Red Buttons, Frank Sinatra and even CBS shows shot on film in NYC like the Phil Silvers and Sargent Bilko shows. How would you like to have references like those at the bottom of page three (right)? Thanks to Dee Wexler, his granddaughter for sharing this. There is much more to come! Please share this with your friends.




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Welcome To An Eyes Of A Generation EXCLUSIVE

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Welcome To An Eyes Of A Generation EXCLUSIVE!

Starting now, we will all be privy to some very interesting facts, details and even a few secrets about ‘The Ed Sullivan Show’, that before now, were never available. Thanks to Dee Wexler, we are going to be able to explore the extraordinary photos and papers left behind by her famous grandfather…Eddie Brinkmann. As Ed Sullivan’s stage manager, Eddie was Sullivan’s right hand man from start till finish. They spent 23 years and 1,054 episodes together creating history on one of televisions most enduring and revered programs. That I know of, no one other than Eddie Brinkmann was there for the entire run of the show. Others came and went, but not Eddie. True, Sullivan did fire him numerous times, but always asked him to come back and among other things, we will see some of those “kiss and make up” letters. There are a lot of interesting things to come, including lots of Sullivan show schedule sheets, never before seen photos and more. I have sent some of the photos to former Sullivan staffers for help on putting names with faces and as we go, I’ll depend on your help too. Please share these posts so that your friends will not miss out.



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Ed Sullivan…A View From The Control Room

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Ed Sullivan…A View From The Control Room

On the left is director John Wray and I’m not sure who the others are at this console. From the stage, this would be in to back left corner behind the audience and I think the booth was entered from a door that would be to the left of John Wray. This is a rehearsal with ventriloquist Rickie Layne but it’s interesting that only a couple of monitors have camera feeds. Perhaps other monitors out of range on the right are showing more. I think in the radio days, the audio booth was isolated but is now accessible from the control room.


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The Studio 50 Audio Booth

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The Studio 50 Audio Booth

On the left you see the new audio booth built in 1936 when CBS took over the theater for use as a radio studio. In 1950, it was converted to a television studio. On the right, Lucy is in rehearsal for a 1956 Sullivan show and behind her, you see the audio booth again. Between the booth and stage, some audience seats had been removed to make room for The Ray Bloch Orchestra. The control room was at the back of the house on this same side and would be just behind the RCA TK30.



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A Rare View Of ‘The Ed Sullivan Show’

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A Rare View Of ‘The Ed Sullivan Show’

This is the only photo I know of that shows the RCA television projection system in use at Studio 50. The screen is roughly 16 x 19 and gives a good look at the broadcast image to those in the upper balcony. The balcony was built as a two tier affair with an upper and lower section separated by a an isle. On the night The Beatles played, there was a camera in the balcony isle and most of the screaming girl shots were from that camera. If you look closely at the lower left, in silhouette, you can see what looks like a camera there now and this is possibly a regular position for one of the six cameras. This photo is from a regular, non Beatles show. The act is Rickie Layne and his wooden friend Velvel. The lower portion of the balcony was removed when the Letterman remodeling took place. By the way, notice the RCA TK30 just above the projection head. It is atop of the stage right scaffold mentioned here last week. Also, you can just barley see a few of the orchastra members on the bottom right.


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Waaaaaaaaaay Down Memory Lane…This is The Ed Sullivan Theater in 1928

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Waaaaaaaaaay Down Memory Lane…

This is The Ed Sullivan Theater in 1928 as we look south from 54th Street. At the time, it was The Hammerstein Theater and had only been open about a year. The marquee display is for “Good Boy” which ran from September 5, 1928 till April 13, 1929 and starred Charles Butterworth and Evelyn Bennett. Busby Berkley choreographed, Arthur Hammerstein produced and Reginald Hammerstein directed. Thanks to our friend Rick Sheckman for the photo.


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“In The Bucket”

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“In The Bucket”

With the exception of the Chapman Electra in NBC’s 8H, there are virtually no crane cameras left in modern broadcast studios, but back in the day, when they were in wide use, the cameraman on the crane’s position was referred to as “in the bucket”. I suspect, but don’t know, that the term came from the bucket seats and sitting in one of them for several hours sure beats standing behind a pedestal camera. This is a great shot of Studio 50s Houston Fearless 30B crane shooting Ringo at the afternoon taping of the Beatles inserts for the February 23rd show. This may be Pat McBride in the bucket operating one of the six Marconi Mark IVs.


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A Hard Day’s Night…The Party After “The Really Big Show”

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A Hard Day’s Night…The Party After “The Really Big Show”

February 9th had been a very long, but amazing work day for The Beatles. To celebrate, NY DJ Murray The K took the boys clubbing. The night’s first stop (left) was the Playboy Club, but after they had seen the bunnies, they left for a much hipper joint, The Peppermint Lounge (right). That I know of, Ringo is the only one that twisted the night away on the dance floor, but a good time was had by all and the party ended around 4AM when Murray parted ways with them at the now quiet Plaza Hotel. How would you like to own this autographed postcard?




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It Was 50 Years Ago, Today…

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It Was 50 Years Ago, Today…

Here is the CBS press release on the Beatles debut on Ed Sullivan and the TV Guide listing for the Los Angeles area. Thanks to David Schwartz at GSN for the TV Guide page. Tomorrow, a wrap up of a few very interesting weeks for me and, what The Beatles did after the show! I hope you enjoy all of tonight’s events! The bottom of the TV Guide page is interesting and was just a few months after that awful day in Dallas. Back then, there was no internet, DVD, VHS tape…nothing but books and 8mm home film for private consumption of major events of the day. My how times have changed! A good smart phone can do it all now.



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Here’s Where The Historic Sullivan Cameras Retired To…

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Here’s Where The Historic Sullivan Cameras Retired To…

http://www.eyesofageneration.com/Gallery_WCNY.php
At the link above, you can read the whole story on the Gallery page of my main website. CBS was very good about donating outdated equipment to colleges and religious broadcasters. Occasionally, public broadcasting stations got some help too, like WCNY in Syracuse NY, which signed on in late 1965. ’65 was the year CBS made a huge commitment to color when the Norelco PC60s debuted. I don’t think WCNY had a live capacity till a few years after they went on the air. Not all of the black and white cameras were thrown overboard though. CBS had a dozen or so Mark VIs at the Broadcast Center which came to life in 1964.


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Without The Cameras, It Would’ve Been A Radio Show…

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Without The Cameras, It Would’ve Been A Radio Show…

Below are a couple of shots of my Marconi Mark IV camera. It is one of only four known to exist in the US. Less than a dozen exist world wide. The night The Beatles performed for the first time in the US, six of these were in use at CBS Studio 50. In 1950, Studio 50 was transformed from a CBS radio studio to a television studio and was equipped with RCA TK30 cameras. ‘The Jackie Gleason Show’ moved from DuMont to CBS and Studio 50 in Sept 1952…Ed Sullivan moved from The Maxine Elliot Theater (CBS Studio 51) in fall 1953 and soon after, RCA TK31s were installed. Around 1962, CBS began using the new Marconi Mark IV cameras at Television City and Studio 50 was the first installation of these fine cameras in New York. My camera is an exact replica of those used fifty years ago tonight to make television history. To see where the Sullivan cameras wound up, see the next post on this page.



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Jimmy’s Last Late Night…Here’s the monologue from last nights final show

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Jimmy’s Last Late Night…

Here’s the monologue from last nights final show. At the end of the show, Fallon walked out of 6A and down the hall to 6B, the new Tonight Show home where he was greeted by his cheering staff. Break a leg Jimmy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1S86FiI3HY

In his last Late Night monologue, Jimmy recognizes some milestones over the years and expresses his gratitude to the staff and crew. Subscribe NOW to Late Ni…
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Thanks For The Tickets Daddy! The Cronkite Girls

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Thanks For The Tickets Daddy!

On the left is Nancy Cronkite and on the right, sister Kathy with Paul and Ringo after the Saturday rehearsal. I wonder if Walter brought them? The girls returned Sunday night for the live show. There is a story that Jack Paar’s daughter Randi, brought Julie and Tricia Nixon to the show, but the story is not true. One guest at the Sunday dress rehearsal was Leonard Bernstein.


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Beatles 50th Sullivan Anniversary Count Down…1 Day

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Beatles 50th Sullivan Anniversary Count Down…1 Day

Tomorrow, well see pictures from the Sunday afternoon press gaggle, but today we’ll look at the Saturday afternoon press gathering. There had been a rehearsal that morning that had stand ins for George who was ill at the Plaza Hotel, but by late afternoon, he was well enough to help tape promos for the up coming shows and for photos. Notice that the crane mounted camera is up behind them as one promo background may have included the bank of photographers. If you look closely at the far right photo, you notice that all of the press have removed their flash attachments. Flash cameras and Image Orthicon television cameras do not get along well and multiple flashes into that Marconi Mark IV would have fried that $5000 IO tube.





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The Beatles’ Debut on ‘Ed Sullivan’

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Hot Off The Press…New York Times

This week, I had the pleasure of meeting and comparing notes with reporter James Barron, who’s article in today’s New York Times appears at this link. Like me, he’s been doing a lot of deep digging through fifty year old details to uncover some of the people and circumstances that surrounded one of America’s most memorable and transformative Sunday nights…The Beatles first appearance on ‘The Ed Sullivan Show’. Enjoy!

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/08/nyregion/the-beatles-debut-on-ed-sullivan.html?hpw&rref=nyregion&_r=0

The Beatles’ Debut on ‘Ed Sullivan’

Fifty years later, audience members who were present at the birth of Beatlemania remember the electric atmosphere and the screaming.
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That Awful Day In Dallas and The First CBS Beatles Film

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That Awful Day In Dallas and The First CBS Beatles Film

Correction and Amplification On One Of Today’s Earlier Posts

Further details have come to light on the first CBS Beatles report. This film was actually shown the morning of November 22, 1963…the day President Kennedy was shot in Dallas. Back then, Mike Wallace was hosting the half hour ‘CBS Morning News’ that aired from 10 -10:30 weekdays. They ran this piece the morning of the 22nd, and it was scheduled to run again that night on the ‘CBS Evening News With Walter Cronkite’ but all that changed just after lunch that day. It would be December 10, 1963 before this footage ran on Cronkite’s show.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6j5bve7O5E

CBS news about The Beatles Before Ed Sullivan and Jack Paar, first time on U.S. TV http://www.recmusicbeatles.com/public/files/saki/kennedy.html 11/18/63 – N…
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