Posts in Category: Broadcast History

’60 Minutes’ From Above…Glenn Mack Photo

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’60 Minutes’ From Above…Glenn Mack Photo

Taken on the catwalk, this shot is looking down on the ’60 Minutes’ green screen set that we saw yesterday. The camera may be a Norelco PC60 (instead of a PC70) as it looks like it has two cables going to it. How clever is that old TD 1 pedestal that has been converted into a monitor stand?


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Live – From Coast to Coast!

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Transcontinental Television History

Here’s another great article from our friend Richard Wirth. The original “broadband” and much more are covered in this write up of how AT&T made coast to coast television possible. The videos are very good too, so take a look! Thanks Richard!

http://provideocoalition.com/pvcexclusive/story/live-from-coast-to-coast

Live – From Coast to Coast!

Today, we think nothing of clicking our remote and have live images from somewhere else in the world appear on the screen.  Push a few buttons on our computer and loved ones living far away appear.  But in television’s early days, a live program meant we were watching a local program.
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Oldest Complete, Color Telecast Of Major League Baseball Game

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Oldest Complete, Color Telecast Of Major League Baseball Game

46 years ago, yesterday, this game was played and shot with RCA TK43 color cameras. Running time is 2 hours and 32 minutes, so if you work for the government and love classic baseball, this is your lucky day! Thanks to Kevin Vahey for the clip. WHDH was television home of the Boston Red Sox baseball club from 1958 through 1971 and did this game that opens with the arrival of a Minnesota native, Hubert Humphrey who was then Vice President under Johnson.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cze3fMSa84w


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The ’60 Minutes’ Set…Another Glenn Mack Photo

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The ’60 Minutes’ Set…Another Glenn Mack Photo

At first glance, this looks like it could be a Betty White, Tim Conway sketch about a pregnant granny, but, it’s not. The is the famous green screen set on ’60 Minutes’ in the early 1970s. As you’ll see tomorrow, the camera is a Norelco PC70. According to Glenn, the ‘Captain Kangaroo’ set is behind him on the other wall.


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Another Great Glenn Mack Photo!

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Another Great Glenn Mack Photo!

From 1964 till 1975, Art Fleming hosted Jeopardy! in NBC Studio 8G at 30 Rock. The game board would be at the far right and it appears that the RCA TK44 on the left is shooting it from across the studio (you can see the layout in the clip below). The original daytime version aired on NBC from March 30, 1964 to January 3, 1975, then spawned a weekly nighttime syndicated edition that aired from September 9, 1974 to September 5, 1975, and was later revived as The All-New Jeopardy!, which ran from October 2, 1978 until March 2, 1979. Both NBC versions and the weekly syndicated version were hosted by Art Fleming. Don Pardo served as announcer until 1975, and John Harlan announced for the 1978–79 show.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AJtYPKNBqg


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‘Star Trek’…Intro To The Second Pilot, Unaired

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‘Star Trek’…Intro To The Second Pilot, Unaired

This may be the only show that had two different pilot episodes. This is the opening from the second pilot ‘Where No Man Has Gone Before’ and this segment was never aired, but, the rest of this pilot did air as the third episode that had the new opening and theme music added.

In Roddenberry’s original concept, the lead character was Captain Robert April of the starship S.S. Yorktown. This character was developed into Captain Christopher Pike, first portrayed by Jeffrey Hunter in the first pilot called ‘The Cage’.

Roddenberry first presented Star Trek to CBS, which turned it down in favor of the Irwin Allen creation Lost in Space. He next presented his concept to the head of Desilu Studio, Herb Solow, who accepted it. Solow then successfully sold the show to NBC which paid for, but turned down, the first pilot stating that it was “too cerebral”. However, the NBC executives were still impressed with the concept, and they understood that its perceived faults had been partly because of the script that they had selected themselves. NBC made the unusual decision to pay for a second pilot, using the script called “Where No Man Has Gone Before”. Only the character of Mr. Spock, played by Leonard Nimoy, was kept from the first pilot, and only two cast members, Majel Barrett and Nimoy, were carried forward into the series. This pilot proved to be satisfactory to NBC, and the network selected Star Trek to be in its upcoming television schedule for the fall of 1966.

The second pilot introduced the rest of the main characters: Captain Kirk (William Shatner), chief engineer Lt. Commander Scott (James Doohan) and Lt. Sulu (George Takei), who served as a physicist on the ship in the second pilot but subsequently became a helmsman throughout the rest of the series. Ship’s doctor Leonard McCoy (DeForest Kelley) joined the cast when filming began for the first season, and he remained for the rest of the series, achieving billing as the third star of the series. Also joining the ship’s permanent crew during the first season was the communications officer, Lt. Uhura (Nichelle Nichols), the first African-American woman to hold such an important role in an American television series.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFtc2Ypwzl0

The original print from Star Trek’s 2nd pilot was never aired in this format. Had different opening narration, credits, had acts 1 thru 4 like an old quinn m…
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SUPER RARE! 3 ‘Tonight Show’ Hosts In One Minute

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SUPER RARE! 3 ‘Tonight Show’ Hosts In One Minute

Steve Allen and Johnny Carson pull a fast one on Jack Paar with a prank call. Carson was already hosting ‘Tonight’ and was taping for a week or so in Los Angeles when he appeared on ‘The New Steve Allen Show’ (1962-64) which was in syndication through Westinghouse. Prior to this episode, Allen placed a telephone call to the home of Johnny Carson, posing as a ratings company interviewer, asking Carson if the Television was on, and what program he was watching. Carson didn’t immediately realize the caller was Allen, and the exchange was classic humor from both, beginning to end. A rarity is the exchange between Allen and Carson about Carson’s guests, permitting him to plug his own show on a competing network.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bex4_9J2ij4

One of my favorite moments in TV History is when Johnny Carson appeared on The Tonight Show with Steve Allen. Steve and Johnny decided to call Jack Paar’s ho…
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Another Rarity: TK60s At NBC Burbank

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Another Rarity: TK60s At NBC Burbank

Compared to others, these cameras had a short life in Burbank. The earliest they could have been bought was late 1962 and with NBC taking the lead to go all color in 1965, they would have been obsolete and sold off. This shot is from a Bob Hope special taping sometime between 1963 and 1965 in Studio 2. Since Hope produced his own shows, he did them in b/w to save money until the 1965 color mandate at NBC. As I understand it, Studios 1 and 3 were color and Studios 2 and 4 were black and white. I don’t recall ever seeing a TK60 at NBC New York, do you?


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‘$64,000 Question’, 1st Anniversary Show, June 7, 1956

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‘$64,000 Question’, 1st Anniversary Show, June 7, 1956

The $64,000 Question premiered June 7, 1955 on CBS-TV, sponsored by cosmetics maker Revlon and originating from the start live from CBS-TV Studio 52 in New York (later the disco-theater Studio 54). The first contestant on the show was Thelma Farrell Bennett, a housewife from Trenton, New Jersey who failed to make it to the first plateau but won a 1955 Cadillac convertible.
To increase the show’s drama and suspense, it was decided to use an actor rather than a broadcaster as the host. Television and film actor Hal March, familiar to TV viewers as a supporting regular on ‘The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show’ and ‘My Friend Irma’, found instant fame as the quiz show’s host, and Lynn Dollar stood nearby as his assistant.

‘The $64,000 Question’ had its roots in the CBS radio quiz show, ‘Take It or Leave It’, which followed in the wake of the pioneering ‘Professor Quiz’ (radio’s first quiz program) and ‘Uncle Jim’s Question Bee’ (the second radio quiz show). ‘Take It or Leave It’ ran from April 21, 1940 to July 27, 1947. It was first hosted by Bob Hawk (1940–41), followed by Phil Baker (1941–47). In 1947, the series switched to NBC, hosted at various times by Baker, Garry Moore (1947–49), Eddie Cantor (1949–50) and Jack Paar (beginning June 11, 1950). On September 10, 1950, ‘Take It or Leave I’t changed its title to ‘The $64 Question’. Paar continued as host, followed by Baker (March–December 1951) and Paar (back on December 1951). The series continued on NBC Radio until June 1, 1952.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dl8h6GtF5Qg

Hal March hosts the show that awards large sums of money to contestants that answer complex questions..
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Behind The ‘Jeopardy’ Game Board

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A Rarity From Glenn Mack…Behind The ‘Jeopardy’ Game Board

This photo taken behind the ‘Jeopardy’ game board is truly unique! When Glenn took this photo, Art Fleming would have been the host and the show came from one of NBC’s 30 Rock studios. In the clip below, we see the board in action and it’s lightning fast flip from the $ amount to the question. These white strips in the middle of the panels look like pull tabs and there appears to be a handle on each of the hinged doors to load the cards. This is more complex than it looks because the $ amount cards have to “disappear up” into the card panel above it. This is marked “Unit C”, I’m thinking there was a unit A and B that were rolled in and out as the players went through the answers on each board. Wonder if there was a D unit?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AJtYPKNBqg


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Super Rare…’Masquerade Party’, May 22, 1955

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Super Rare…’Masquerade Party’, May 22, 1955

Only five episodes are known to exist of this show that I remember watching as a kid. From 1952-1960, the show aired on ABC, NBC and CBS at various times and had six different hosts. To my amazement, one host was none other than CBS newsman Douglas Edwards in 1953! The other hosts were Bud Collyer (1952), Peter Donald (1954–1956), Eddie Bracken (1957), Robert Q. Lewis (1958) and Bert Parks (Fall 1958–1960). You won’t believe who the second guest is with that great scottish accent! The announcer is Johnny Olson and one of the producers was Alan Sherman who also worked on ‘What’s My Line’.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owpsw5l4t2M

A panel of celebrities try to guess the identity of another celebrity that is in heavy makeup and/or costume..A 1950’s classic game show!..Hosted by Peter Do…
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The Truth About Bert And Ernie! Ever wonder how Ernie could use both hands?

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The Truth About Bert And Ernie!

Ever wonder how Ernie could use both hands? Now we know! Here’s Jim Henson (center) with Ernie and Richard Hunt who’s working the right hand. Occasionally, Frank Oz (right) and Bert would use both hands which required another puppet. As always, they are watching the monitor in even the rehearsals like this. To the left is their “stage” that the Muppets would appear above while it hid the puppet masters.


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Fun With A Marconi Mark IV

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Fun With A Marconi Mark IV

Thanks to Gustavo Borjalo for this clip that shows the TV host and businessman, Silvio Santos in conversation with Brazilian singers Roberto Carlos and Wanderléa. The three are having fun with a Mark IV in one of the Record-TV’s studios, São Paulo, Brazil, 1970. Today, Mr. Santos is the owner of SBT (Brazilian Television System), the second largest network in Brazil, but continues to host his Sunday TV show. Roberto Carlos is still the most popular singer in Brazil. Wanderléa keeps singing, but without the same success as before.

#t=299″ target=”_blank”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rWgXcAGonJ4 #t=299

Em um bate-papo informal e descontraído, Silvio Santos entrevista Roberto Carlos, brincando dentro do estúdio da TV Record, com a participação de Wanderlea. …
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The EMI 203 Camera In Action

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The EMI 203 Camera In Action

Although EMI cameras were ultra rare in the US, they were quite common many other countries, and staples at the BBC. Debuting in 1960, the 203 was a five lens monochrome camera that could use either 4.5 or 3 inch Image Orthicons and make pictures for 405, 525 or 624 line systems.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-MLpBW0gAY

EMI B&W Television camera, shown in a segment from the children’s show “Dodli” shot in 1977 at the Instructional Television Center in Tel Aviv
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ULTRA RARE EXCLUSIVE! View From Behind Walter Cronkite’s Desk!

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ULTRA RARE EXCLUSIVE!

If you have ever wondered what Walter Cronkite saw from his desk, wonder no more. Thanks to Glenn Mack, here is a shot from behind that famous desk in the newsroom at the CBS Broadcast Center from around 1974. It appears that the two Norelco PC70s are in the process of having their teleprompters changed to newer models. It looks like both cameras are mounted on height adjustable tripods that were usually found only on movie sets, perhaps made by Movieola. Anyone know?


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Poetry In Motion! .RCA TK47s In Action

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Poetry In Motion! Must See…RCA TK47s In Action

Shot by an audience member in June of 1988 at PTL Club taping, you can see the fluid movement of these 4 cameras. 2 are mounted on Vinten Tern pedestals and 2 are on Vinten Fulmars.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsW4UUcH5S4

In this 3rd video I’ve uploaded which relates specifically to the Heritage USA TV studio, I had to cut the video short. As with a number of my old videos sto…
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Yes, Jim McKay Did Have A Sense Of Humor…

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Yes, Jim McKay Did Have A Sense Of Humor…

Some thought ABC’s top sportscaster had no sense of humor, but as you can see with this ‘crew gag’, he did. This is from the 1984 Sarajevo Winter Olympics. I think everyone in the anchor booth and truck had a pair of these and the rumor was, they wore them quite a bit to break up the fatigue of very long days that included covering events live and coming back on the air in US prime time to host the highlights of the day.


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More From Glenn Mack, NBC’s Studio 6B ..

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More From Glenn Mack

Below is another photo from Glenn of NBC’s Studio 6B just after Johnny Carson had left for California. In the weeks ahead, there will be more but in the meantime, here is a little about Glenn and how these photos came to be in his own words.

I grew up on Long Island, just outside New York City. It was during the golden era of New York television production. I had taken the NBC studio tour more times than I can remember. I was always interested in what went on behind the scenes. While watching The Tonight Show, I’d watch for a glimpse of the normally unseen part of the studio. I guess I got it from my dad, who was able to get into some Hollywood movie studios in the 40’s and 50’s. My Godfather was Robert Pittack, Cinematographer. (To me, most famous for shooting some of the Twilight Zone TV series). In that sense, I was always aware of the business.

I was thrilled when a friend of the family, who worked for NBC, brought me in for a personal tour. This was in 1972. I was around 15 years old, and I was just starting my interest in photography. My dad, who was really the photographer in the family, wasn’t going to let an opportunity like this go by. So, he outfitted me with a 35mm Pentax, a 400 ASA color slide film, and I was on my way. Keep in mind, no photography was allowed on the regular tour, so I was in heaven.

About a month later, another family friend who worked for CBS in New York, took me on a personal tour of CBS studios. There were no public tours of CBS, so this was really a coup. Of course, I brought the camera once again.

Now, many years later, I didn’t know if there was any interest in what I had. Until I found eyesofageneration.com, and Bobby Ellerbee. For a while, I was happy just looking at some of the great pictures Bobby would post. Then I decided to email him and tell him about some photos I had, that were “pretty good”. Judging by his reaction, I guess they are “pretty good”.

The are INDEED “pretty good” Glen! Do you have photos like this? Please let me know if you do!


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NBC Studio 6B…Johnny Is Gone! Glenn Mack Photo

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The Glenn Mack Photos…A Small Sample Of Things To Come

This is a gorgeous photo of NBC Studio 6B taken by Glenn Mack shortly after ‘The Tonight Show’ moved to California. Just behind the RCA TK44, who’s tally lights are lit, would have been where Johnny’s desk and guests would have been. More on Glenn and more of his stunning photos tomorrow, but in the mean time, enjoy!


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Good Evening Vietnam!

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Good Evening Vietnam!

An RCA TK60 shoots the control room of American Forces Vietnam, or AFVN, television in Saigon in 1972 for a segment in the evening news cast. Did you know the navy had TK60s on their aircraft carriers to show the flight deck to the controllers on the bridge?


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Innovate, Innovate, Innovate…

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Innovate, Innovate, Innovate…

When you’ve absolutely, positively have to have a crane, but can’t get one…build your own! These guys did and did a darn good job!


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Harry Coyle – NBC Game of the Week

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One Camera And Cameraman Saved The Day At NBC

In a 1982 NBC Game Of The Week broadcast from Fenway Park, the truck lost power (at 2:46) and only one of the 6 RCA TK760 cameras was able to recover to finish the game. A cameraman named Mario Cialro saved the day and had the whole NBC network all to himself. There happened to be a crew in the truck shooting a pre game segment with a battery powered camera and VTR and caught the legendary Harry Coyle calling the “shot”. Coyle pioneered the look of baseball on television and directed 36 World Series over a 42 year career. Thanks to David Crosthwait for the clip.

http://rick-reed.com/?p=950

Harry Coyle – NBC Game of the Week

A Video Collection
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‘The Pontiac Star Parade’ 1959

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‘The Pontiac Star Parade’ 1959

Here’s Gene Kelly in the dress rehearsal at NBC Burbank. At the link below you can see another clip from the show that gives you a good look at one of the huge studios and some pretty fancy crane camera work at the start. The cameras were RCA TK41s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dp8eT8mFDlo&list=PL2D372E3C5A2C80B7&index=6


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‘Cinderella Weekend’, WCAU Philadelphia

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‘Cinderella Weekend’, WCAU Philadelphia

This is a photo from 1950 taken at WCAU’s Chestnut Street studio. That’s a pretty interesting General Electric pedestal under that RCA TK30. Although ‘Cinderella Weekend’ was produced locally in each market, it was actually a package show that stations paid a fee for. Monday-Friday homemakers answered questions from a panel for a daily winner, and on Friday, one of the daily winners would win the weekend sightseeing trip to NYC.


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Chicagoland Television Icons

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Chicagoland Television Icons

Perhaps the only major 50s personality missing in this photo is Hugh Downs who was at WBKB when this was made, but joined the NBC staff the next year. 1 is the staff of ‘Kukla, Fran and Ollie’. 2 is the staff of ‘Stud’s Place’ with Studs Terkel. 3 is the staff of ‘Garroway At Large’. 4 is handyman Walt Durbhab of ‘Walt’s Workshop’. 5 is Clint Youle, the Casual Weatherman. 6 is Cliff Norton, Garroway’s funnyman. 7 is Dave Garroway, and 8 is Jules Hernuveaux, NBC’s Chicago Director of Network Operations.


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Jerry Lewis and Video Assist

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Follow Up: Jerry Lewis and Video Assist

A few days ago, I posted a photo of Lewis with a Dumont Electronicam and told some of the story of his work in developing video assist for movies. Here is the whole story from an article I wrote a while back complete with some interesting photos with details on the picture pages.


In a way, he really is ‘The Nutty Professor’. After the Martin & Lewis breakup, Jerry began to get more involved in movie making and television and his first TV directing experience was on an episode of ‘Ben Casey, MD’ that he also appered in. In 1960, he wrote directed and starred in ‘The Bell Boy’ and that’s where the video assist process started. Jerry had console built to house a couple of audio tape recorders, a turntable and a Sony video tape recorder. Along the same lines as the Dumont Electrocam from the 50’s, Lewis mounted a video camera on the film camera and the rest, as they say is history.
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Audrey Hepburn Full Screen Test

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The Great Audrey Hepburn

Although she had played a few small roles on film and starred on Broadway as ‘Gigi’, ‘Roman Holiday’ was her first starring role. The film was set in Italy and done in 1953. Hepburn played Princess Ann, an incognito European princess who, escaping the reins of royalty, falls in love with an American newsman played by Gregory Peck. While producers initially wanted Elizabeth Taylor for the role, director William Wyler was so impressed by Hepburn’s screen test that he cast her in the lead. Wyler later commented, “She had everything I was looking for: charm, innocence, and talent. She also was very funny. She was absolutely enchanting”…below is the screen test.

Originally, the film was to have had only Gregory Peck’s name above its title, with “Introducing Audrey Hepburn” beneath in smaller font. However, Peck suggested to Wyler that he elevate her to equal billing so that her name appeared before the title and in type as large as his: “You’ve got to change that because she’ll be a big star and I’ll look like a big jerk.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSnKWwRCWnw

Audrey Hepburn Full Screen Test

Audrey Hepburn’s full screen test for 1953’s Roman Holiday.
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Sound pioneer Ray Dolby dies

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Remembering Ray Dolby

His first job was at Ampex working on video tape recording. From there, the rest is history. He was a true pioneer in audio and will be missed.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/09/12/ray-dolby-dies/2807823/

Sound pioneer Ray Dolby dies

445 62 Share This Story!Let friends in your social network know what you are reading aboutFacebookEmailTwitterGoogle+LinkedInSound pioneer Ray Dolby diesPost to Facebook Incorrect please try again Try Another Audio Captcha Image CAPTCHA Help CancelSendPosted!A link has been posted to your Facebook f…
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There’s No Place Like “Home”…Studio 33

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There’s No Place Like “Home”…Studio 33

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21bd_zY3MS0

Here’s Carol Burnett with CBS Newsman Lee Cowan. In the clip linked above, you’ll see his 8 minute visit with her that ran on ‘Sunday Morning’. Nice piece with some interesting shots along the way. Enjoy!


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The Lone Ranger…Something You My Not Have Known

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The Lone Ranger…Something You My Not Have Known

Here’s Clayton Moore visiting ABC affiliate WATE in Knoxville during a charity telethon. The show’s original run was from September 1949 till September 1957 on ABC. It starred Jay Silverheals as Tonoto and Moore as The Lone Ranger, BUT…from 52 till 53, Moore was replaced by John Heart over a salary dispute. Unless any of us saw and remember the first run of the show, we would never have known this because when ABC, CBS and NBC aired the show in reruns, they never aired the season with John Heart. Thanks to James Finch for the photo.


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