Posts in Category: Broadcast History

‘All Star Review’, 1952…One Of The First Camera Mounted Teleprompters

‘All Star Review’, 1952

In the last year of so of this NBC show, Martha Raye was the host of this popular show as it morphed from a rotating host format to a single host. Soon after, it became ‘The Martha Raye Show’. In this shot, Martha is rehearsing a spot for Kellogs with Arthur Treachur who played many a butler role and a few years later, went on to become Merv Griffin’s side kick and straight man. Notice the huge teleprompter being held onto the TK10 with a strap. Thanks to David Zornig and Jim Young for the photo.

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Look Ma…No Viewfinders!

Look Ma…No Viewfinders!

The RCA TK30s became available in late 1946, but there was some element used in building the viewfinders that was in very short supply. The networks got viewfinders, but the local stations had to wait. The problem went away after about six months, but local stations that bought them had do make do for a while. Shown here is a 1946 Christmas parade in St. Louis, covered by KSD TV. The good news was that there were very few sets in use at the time. The only way to make this work was to put a monitor near the cameras and have the director talk the cameramen into the right shots.

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RCA TK60s In Action…Richmond’s ‘Sailor Bob Show’


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Small World…As it turns out, this is one of my RCA TK60s.

Small World…

As it turns out, this is one of my RCA TK60s. I just found this photo in a 1960s RCA Broadcast News…it was shot at WCVE TV which is Richmond, Virginia’s PBS station. They had two TK60s and I have them both in my collection now.

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One Of My Favorite Cameras…Marconi Mark IV

One Of My Favorite Cameras

This is the Marconi Mark IV. It’s standard tube was the 4.5″ Image Orthicon and this could have been the first camera to make use of the 4.5″ IO as the 1958 RCA TK14 used the 3″ and it was not till 1960 that the TK12 aka TK60 debuted with a 4.5″ IO. The camera debuted in 1958 and by 1960 had began to show up in the US. CBS used them at Television City and in Studio 50 (Ed Sullivan Theater) in New York. I think CBS also had some on network mobile units. WAGA and the PBS station in Atlanta had them and so did a big mobile production company based in Washington DC.

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The Baughman Pedestal

The Baughman Pedestal

This little mobile pedestal was a real work horse from the 1950s till the 80s. Originally made by Baughman, Houston Fearless copied it as did other camera support makers including ITC. There was a hydraulic version and this one, the manual crank version for height adjustment. This is my RCA TK11/31 mounted on a manual crank Baughman pedestal. They were so strong, you could even mount TK42s on them which weighed almost 300 pounds.

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The CBS Field Sequential Color System

The Answer to Randy West’s Question, And More…

In a recent post showing the CBS Field Sequential Color Cameras, Randy asked where the mechanical color wheel was on the camera. Take a look at the extra plate added just above the lens turret on this modified RCA TK10…the color wheel is mounted behind that plate. A red, blue, green and clear filter wheel spins between the “taking lens” (the top center lens) and IO tube, just inside the camera chassis. The small electric motor is mounted on the bottom rear of the camera (not shown).

Now, the more important part…a short Bio of the inventor of the CBS Field Sequential System…

Peter Carl Goldmark: Creator of LP records and Field Sequential Color

Below is CBS President Frank Stanton (r) and creator of the Field Sequential Color System, Peter Goldmark with one of the CBS field sequential studio cameras…a retro fitted RCA TK10.

Goldmark was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1906. As a student at the University of Vienna he was fascinated by the technology of television. While pursuing his bachelor’s degree he designed a television receiver with a screen about the size of a postage stamp. After obtaining his Ph.D. in 1931, Goldmark decided to emigrate to the United States to join the Radio Corporation of America, ( RCA), then the premier laboratory for television research. He was refused a position with RCA, however, and took up with their competitors, the Columbia Broadcasting System ( CBS), for whom he accrued a long and impressive list of accomplishments.

In all, Goldmark received more than 180 patents for CBS. Though he labored for several years to develop more practical television technology, it was not until 1940 that he conceived of his first great idea. While attending a showing of Gone with the Wind (the first color film he had ever seen), he came upon an idea for color television. During the next three months he designed the system known now as field-sequential color.

Basically, the system used a standard black-and-white camera and television receiver; placed in front of the camera was a spinning disk holding three colored filters–red, blue, and green. By synchronizing the camera’s color disk with a second disk within the television, a very sharp color picture was achieved. The debut of field-sequential color broadcasts was delayed by the outbreak of World War II. After the war years, CBS petitioned the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to approve Goldmark’s design.

At the same time, RCA was developing its own method for color television. The picture quality of the RCA system was vastly inferior to Goldmark’s; however, it was compatible with existing television sets–that is, a standard television could receive the RCA signal (albeit in black and white) but not the CBS transmission, for which a whole new television set was necessary. Since the Goldmark method would have made nine million black-and-white sets immediately obsolete, the FCC eventually ruled to make the RCA system the standard.

The field-sequential color television–which still provides the best color reproduction available–has found a niche, particularly in areas such as medical instruction that demand precise color definition. In the late 1960s, Goldmark modified his television to enable National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA) to clearly photograph the surface of the Moon, even from the Lunar Orbiter’s altitude of 29 mi.(47 km).

Goldmark can also be considered the father of video recording. With the goal of producing a tool for educational media storage, he developed a system called electronic video recording (EVR). Basically, EVR consists of a cartridge wound with black-and-white film that could be slipped into a recorder/player machine. Even though it was filmed in black and white, Goldmark’s ingenious design used a separate recording track to store the color signal, so that the final playback would be in color.

One advantage of EVR over magnetic tape storage is that it can record still frames as well as motion; by filming a page of written information onto a single EVR frame, an entire encyclopedia can be stored on one cassette. Although video cassette recorders ( VCR ) have since captured the home recording market, the EVR is still considered useful in the storage of written material.

The idea for Goldmark’s most successful invention came to him one evening in the early 1940s. While listening to a recording of Brahms at a party, Goldmark was annoyed by the constant clicks and interruptions in the music, since the 78 rpm records were far too short to contain the entire concert, and the host had to periodically flip or change the disks. Goldmark envisioned an album whose grooves were cut much closer together and whose turntable turned much slower, allowing more music on each side. He worked on solving this problem for three years, ultimately producing the first LP record. His microgroove recordings held the equivalent of six 78 rpm records; also, by switching to vinyl, the LP’s recordings had a far superior sound quality. To combat the new CBS-manufactured LP, RCA quickly designed the 45 rpm “single.” Though the single record found some success, Goldmark’s LP absolutely conquered the market for more than forty years.

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NBC Burbank Studio 1

Now You Know Why…

Ever wonder why Johnny Carson sometime looked like he was talking to a balcony audience? Well, take a good look at Studio 1 in Burbank and you’ll understand. Although there is no balcony, the audience seating is very high and at a pretty steep incline…like stadium seating and the people in the back are waaay up there. Thanks to Martin Perry for the photo.

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Per Episode Production Cost Of One Hour Shows 1970

Per Episode Production Cost Of One Hour Shows

The 1970s was the first full decade of all color programming for all networks. These figures are quite tame compared to today’s costs! Click to enlarge for the whole list.

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Early Color Challenges

Early Color Challenges

How do you develop first quality color broadcasts without the ability to properly monitor and calibrate your results? The answer for RCA was with patience and lots of testing. That’s what the Colonial Theater was for. This photo was taken there around 1953 and shows one (one of four) of the prototype models of the brand new RCA TK40 (notice no vents on the VF) shooting a flower arrangement because there were no color test charts yet. There weren’t even precision color monitors yet! Developing color broadcast systems at RCA presented a multitude of challenges.

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How ‘I Love Lucy’ Was Produced…The Details

How ‘I Love Lucy’ Was Produced…The Details

Below is a view of tri-set layout on Stage 2 of General Service Studio where the weekly “I Love Lucy” film show is produced. All lighting is from overhead, with units mounted so they can be changed with a minimum of time and effort. The show is photographed with three Mitchell 35mm BNC cameras, all shooting simultaneously. Camera (1) in center makes all the long shots, while closeups are filmed by cameras (2) and (3) at either side. Besides floor markers and memorized instructions, technical staff also is monitored by script girl via intercom phone system as show progresses. Retakes are rare and time between setups averages but a minute and a half.

Although each weekly show goes before the cameras at 8 o’clock Friday evenings, and is photographed entirely the same evening, the preceding four days are employed by the company in rehearsals, pre-production planning and script revision. the camera crews have but two schedules in the five-day period — on Thursday and Friday.

The director, actors and writers gather on the stage for a reading of the script on Monday and Tuesday; late Tuesday afternoon the first of the rehearsals are held. By Wednesday afternoon, the company is ready to run through the show for Director of Photography Karl Freund. This usually takes place at 4:30. No cameras are on the set at this time, nor are any members of the camera crews present. During this rehearsal, Freund studies the players and their movements about the sets, takes notes of how and where they enter and exit, and plans his camera operations and lighting accordingly.

The following morning at eight o’clock Freund and his electrical crew begin the task of lighting the sets, and endeavor to have the job completed by noon. At this time, the camera crew members come on the set and are briefed on camera movements, etc. With the crews and cameras assembled on the stage, camera action is rehearsed. This enables Freund to make any necessary changes in the lighting or operation of the camera dollies. Cues for the dimmer operator are worked out at this time. Chalk marks are placed on the floor indicating the positions the cameras are to take for the various shots or the range of the dolly action for a given scene.

At 4:30PM Thursday, there is another rehearsal — this time with the camera crews, gaffers, sound men, etc., on hand. Then at 7:30 the same evening a dress rehearsal is held, Freund, camera operators, gaffers and grips are on hand — but the cameras are not brought onto the floor. At this time the general plan of the show is discussed by the director. Notes are made for future guidance by all present. An open discussion then follows at which time lines of dialogue are cut, action shortened or deleted, camera movements analyzed…in short, everything is done at this time that will tighten up the show and improve its pace. This is the period in pre-production planning when problems are aired and suggestions made and considered.

On Friday, when the show is scheduled to be shot, there is a 1 PM call for everyone in the company — players, technicians, the producer and the director and his staff. If any major changes in the action, dialogue or camera treatment were decided in the previous evening’s discussions, these are now worked into the show during another general rehearsal.

A final dress rehearsal takes place at 4:30 PM, with the cameras now on the floor. Freund gives his lighting a final check, makes any necessary last minute changes before the company breaks for dinner.

After dinner, company and cast return to the stage, and there follows a general “talk through” of the show. At this time, further suggestions are considered and decisions made on any remaining problems, so that by 8 o’clock the company is ready to film the show.

In the meantime, the audience seating on the stage has rapidly filled and Desi Arnaz or some other member of the company is briefing the audience on the show, explaining the filming procedure, and emphasizing the importance its natural, spontaneous reaction plays in the show’s success.

Then for approximately sixty minutes the show is filmed. As soon as action is completed for one set up, the cameras, crew and players move rapidly to the next set up, and the action is resumed. All scenes are shot in chronological order. Each episode is 22 minutes long.

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‘I Love Lucy’…What The Actors Saw

‘I Love Lucy’

From the set, here is a look at what Lucy, Rickey, Fred and Ethyl saw when they filmed. In the white shirt between the boom and camera, Desi Arnaz visits with the audience before he does the warm up, which he usually did for each show. The third man to the right of the camera in the dark shirt is Director of Photography Karl Freund.

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Live From Leiderkrantz Hall?

Live From Leiderkrantz Hall?

Yes! That was where Douglas Edwards began hosting network television’s very first, live anchor news show. CBS Studios 53 through 56 were located there at 111 East 58th Street from 1947 through 1964. Amazingly, the news room was 10 blocks away and each night, it was a mad dash via taxi to the studio with scripts in hand.

The photo is of the first set of ‘CBS Television News’ which Douglas Edwards began hosting for CBS on Saturday nights, expanding to two nights a week in 1947. On May 3, 1948, ‘CBS Television News’ became a regular 15-minute nightly newscast. It aired every weeknight at 7:30 PM, and was the first regularly scheduled, network television news program to use an anchor. The week’s news stories were recapped Sunday night with ‘Newsweek in Review’. The name was later shortened to ‘Week in Review’ and the show was moved to Saturday.

In 1950, the name of the nightly news was changed to ‘Douglas Edwards With The News’, and I think then moved from Leiderkrantz to the CBS Grand Central Studios. In 1951, it became the first news program to be broadcast on both coasts, thanks to a new coaxial cable connection, prompting Edwards to use the greeting “Good evening everyone, coast to coast.”

The program competed against NBC’s ‘Camel News Caravan’ that was launched in 1949 with John Cameron Swayze. Edwards attracted more viewers during the mid-1950s, but began losing them when Chet Huntley and David Brinkley were teamed up by NBC on the ‘Huntley-Brinkley Report’. In September 1955, Edwards was moved to 6:45 PM, with some affiliates having the option of carrying a 7:15 PM edition.

On November 30, 1956, the show became the first to use the new technology of videotape to time delay the broadcast for the western U.S.

Walter Cronkite replaced Edwards on April 16, 1962 and the show became ‘The CBS Evening News’. On September 2, 1963, CBS Evening News became network television’s first half-hour weeknight news broadcast, lengthened from its original 15 minutes, and telecast at 6:30 PM. The Huntley-Brinkley Report expanded to 30 minutes on September 9, 1963, exactly a week after CBS did.

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Day One Of ‘Today’

Day One Of ‘Today’

Below is a photo taken on January 14, 1952…the day ‘Today’ debuted. In pre-production panning, the show went by the title of ‘The Rise And Shine Revue’. Dave Garroway (shown here) was the original host and was joined by news editor Jim Fleming and announcer Jack Lescoulie when the show debuted. Legendary and pioneering NBC president, Sylvester “Pat” Weaver, chose Garroway as the host of his new morning news-and-entertainment experiment in 1951.

Garroway began his broadcasting career modestly. Starting at NBC as a page in 1938, he graduated 23rd in a class of 24 from NBC’s school for announcers. Following graduation, he landed a job at Pittsburgh radio station KDKA in 1939. After two years with KDKA, Garroway left for Chicago. Garroway was introduced to the national television audience when he hosted the experimental musical variety show ‘Garroway at Large’, telecast live from Chicago. It was carried by NBC from June 18, 1949, to June 24, 1951.

At the same time he did ‘Today’, Garroway also hosted a Friday night variety series on NBC, ‘The Dave Garroway Show’, from October 2, 1953, to June 25, 1954. On October 16, 1955, he began hosting NBC’s live Sunday afternoon documentary ‘Wide Wide World’, continuing with that series until June 8, 1958. Another Friday evening variety show, Dave’s Place, was on the air in 1960. He also hosted a WNBC radio show, Dial Dave Garroway, that went on the air as soon as Today wrapped up each morning. Dial Dave Garroway began in 1946 when Garroway was still working for WMAQ in Chicago.

When Today started, it was seen live only in the Eastern and Central time zones, broadcasting three hours per morning but seen for only two hours in each time zone. Since 1958, Today is tape-delayed for the different time zones. Partly to accommodate host Dave Garroway’s declining health, the program ceased live broadcasts in the summer of 1958, opting instead to broadcast an edition taped the prior afternoon. The experiment, which drew criticism from many sides, ended when John Chancellor replaced Garroway in July 1961.

For many years Today was a two-hour program, from 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. in all time zones except for Alaska, Hawaii and U.S. Virgin Islands, until NBC expanded it to three hours on October 2, 2000. A fourth hour was added on September 10, 2007.

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‘Mike And Buff’

‘Mike And Buff’

In response to yesterday’s post on the CBS color broadcasts, Mark VonderEmbse noticed one of the shows broadcast was the ‘Mike And Buff’ show with Mike Wallace and then wife, Buff Cobb. Here is a 1951 publicity photo of them Mark sent. Thanks!

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The 1936 RCA Iconoscope Camera (2 of 2)

The 1936 RCA Iconoscope Camera (2 of 2)

These cameras opened from the rear and tilted forward for access to the tubes. On the left is the “studio version” which used a larger Iconoscope tube than the “field version” on the right, which usually had daylight to help light the scenes. Notice on the right, you can see the camera lenses and the optical viewfinder above the tube as the top is tipped forward. Thanks to Brian Summers and his great web site, http://www.tvcameramuseum.org/

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The 1936 RCA Iconoscope Camera (1 of 2)

The 1936 RCA Iconoscope Camera (1 of 2)

This is the original version of the first commercially available television cameras in the US. You often see this same camera chassis style painted silver, but actually, they are the same cameras.  The only difference is that the silver version, called the RCA A500 has a different Iconoscope tube with 441 line resolution. This dark colored model has no model identification other than “studio version”, as there was also a field version with no viewfinder. This one is shooting Burgess Meredith and Dorothy McGuire on a 1938 production at NBC in NYC.

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EMI, The Start Of Something Big…

EMI, The Start Of Something Big…

Below is an EMI 203 Image Orthicon camera from 1960, but broadcast was just one area EMI was involved in. Here’s a short course on their history. Electric and Musical Industries Ltd was formed in March 1931 by the merger of the Columbia Graphophone Company and the Gramophone Company, with its “His Master’s Voice” record label, firms that have a history extending back to the origins of recorded sound. The new company produced sound recordings as well as recording and playback equipment.

The company’s gramophone manufacturing led to forty years of success with larger-scale electronics and electrical engineering. During and after the Second World War, the EMI Laboratories in Hayes, Hillingdon developed radar equipment and guided missiles, employing analogue computers. The company later became involved in broadcasting equipment, notably providing the first television transmitter to the BBC. It also manufactured broadcast television cameras for British television production companies, and for the BBC. The commercial television ITV companies used them as well alongside cameras made by Pye and Marconi. Their best remembered piece of broadcast television equipment was the EMI 2001 colour television camera, which became the mainstay of much of the British television industry from the end of the 1960s until the early 1980s. Exports of this piece of equipment were low, however, and EMI left this area of product manufacture.

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KTLA Mobile Units 1956


KTLA Mobile Units 1956

In the first 3 or 4 minutes, we get to see the KTLA mobile units set up their TK30s and film cameras to cover the opening of the Capitol Records Tower. Thanks to David Crosthwait for sending this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2pJA-7hOSM

Some very early news reel coverage featuring the opening of the Capitol Records Tower in 1956. This reel was originally presented in the “silent newsreel” fo…

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Dinah Shore…Her Early TV Career

Dinah Shore…Her Early TV Career

Soon after she arrived in New York in 1937, Shore made her first television appearances on experimental broadcasts for NBC. Twelve years later, in 1949, she made her official television show debut on the Ed Wynn Show and in 1950 made a guest appearance on Bob Hope’s first television show. After being on other television shows, she got her own program, The Dinah Shore Show on NBC in 1951.She did two 15-minute shows a week for NBC til 1955.

In 1956, Shore began hosting a monthly series of one-hour full-color spectaculars as part of NBC’s The Chevy Show series. These proved so popular that the show was renamed The Dinah Shore Chevy Show the following season, with Shore becoming the full-time host of the show that aired three out of four weeks in the month. Broadcast live and in NBC’s famous “Living Color,” this variety show was one of the most popular of the 1950s and early 1960s and featured the television debuts of stars of the era, such as Yves Montand and Maureen O’Hara, and featured Dinah in performances alongside Ella Fitzgerald, Mahalia Jackson, Peggy Lee, Frank Sinatra and Pearl Bailey. She also appeared as a guest on another Chevrolet-sponsored variety show, The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom on ABC.

The Dinah Shore Chevy Show ran through the 1961-1962 season, after which Chevrolet dropped sponsorship, and Shore hosted a series of monthly broadcasts sponsored by The American Dairy Association and Green Stamps. Simply called “The Dinah Shore Show”, Dinah’s guests included Nat “King” Cole, Bing Crosby, Jack Lemmon, and a young Barbra Streisand. Over twelve seasons, from 1951 to 1963, Shore made 125 hour-long programs and 444 fifteen-minute shows. She always ended her televised programs by throwing an enthusiastic kiss directly to the cameras (and viewers) and exclaiming “MWAH!” to the audience.

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From KECA To KABC…

From KECA To KABC…

Before we get to the history, notice the dual floodlights on the front of this RCA TK10. Channel 7 first signed on the air under the callsign KECA-TV on September 16, 1949. It was the last television station licensed to Los Angeles operating on the VHF band to sign on, and the last of ABC’s five original owned-and-operated stations to make their debut (after San Francisco’s KGO-TV, which signed on four months earlier).

The station’s callsign was named after Los Angeles broadcasting pioneer Earle C. Anthony, whose initials were also present on channel 7’s then-sister radio station, KECA (790 AM), which had served as the Los Angeles affiliate of the NBC Blue Network. Anthony’s other Los Angeles radio station, KFI, was aligned with the Red Network. The Red Network survived the split of the two NBC radio networks ordered by the Federal Communications Commission in 1943. Edward J. Noble, who bought the Blue Network (beginning its transformation into ABC), purchased KECA radio a year later when the FCC forced Anthony to divest one of his Los Angeles radio stations. On February 1, 1954, KECA-TV changed its callsign to the present-day KABC-TV.

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On Location…Taking a breather between scenes

On Location…

Taking a breather between scenes, Batman and Robin plan their moves in the Batmobile before the director calls “Action”. It aired on ABC for three seasons from January 12, 1966 to March 14, 1968. The show was aired twice weekly for its first two seasons, resulting in the production of a total of 120 episodes.

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The Vinten ‘Heron’ Studio Crane …

Takes A Lickin’ And Keeps On Tickin’

This is the Vinten ‘Heron’ studio crane and a Marconi Mark VIII plumbicon camera at the CBC studios in Montreal in the early to mid 70s. After a long stay in storage, it was returned to service last year.

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Before Lucy, Gertrude Berg was “The First Lady Of Television”

Before Lucy, Gertrude Berg was “The First Lady Of Television”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdoL7N48OWA

‘The Goldbergs’ was a comedy-drama broadcast from 1929 to 1946 on radio, and from 1949 to 1956 on television. The program was devised by writer-actress Gertrude Berg in 1928 and sold to the NBC radio network the following year. It was a domestic comedy featuring the home life of a Jewish family, supposedly located at 1038 East Tremont Avenue in the Bronx. In addition to writing the scripts and directing each episode, Berg starred in the series. The link above is to a clip of a 1949 episode on CBS.

The television version ran on CBS Television from 1949 to 1951 and co-starred Philip Loeb as Jake Goldberg. He and Gertrude Berg reprised their roles in a 1950 film of the same name. The show almost didn’t get to the small screen at all: CBS executives were uncertain that the show would work on television as well as it did on radio. Berg prevailed, however, and picked up General Foods (Sanka coffee) as its sponsor.

Berg, who continued to write every episode, insisted that no studio audience be used and made sure everyday events formed the base for the stories; she was once quoted as saying she avoided “anything that will bother people … unions, fund raising, Zionism, socialism, intergroup relations. … I keep things average. I don’t want to lose friends.” Berg’s hard work and determination paid off. In 1950, she won the first Best Actress Emmy Award for her role as Molly on The Goldbergs.

The Goldbergs was destined to spend almost a decade on television—but not without disruptions. In 1950, Philip Loeb was blacklisted and pressure was placed on Berg (who owned the television version as she had the radio original) to fire him. When she refused, General Foods cancelled their sponsorship, and CBS dropped it from their schedule by June 1951.

Eight months later, however NBC—the show’s original broadcasting home—picked up the series for the 1952–53 season, but informed Gertrude Berg that if she persisted in allowing Philip Loeb to remain with the series, it would never be seen on television again. She finally gave in, and the series reappeared in a twice-weekly, early-evening 15 minute format (with another change in title, to Molly, in due course), with Harold Stone and then Robert H. Harris replacing Loeb as Jake, though Berg quietly continued to pay a salary to Loeb.

After The Goldbergs ended its CBS run, Tom Taylor replaced Larry Robinson in the role of Molly’s son, Sammy. The rest of the television cast included Eli Mintz as Uncle David, Arlene McQuade as Rosalie and Betty Bendyke as Dora Barnett. On radio, Sammy and Rosalie had grown up and gotten married; on television, the characters were revived as teenagers. During this time, Gertrude Berg and Arlene McQuade appeared as their characters of Molly and Rosalie, respectively, when they guested on NBC-TV’s Texaco Star Theater starring Milton Berle.

In 1954, the show reverted to a weekly half-hour, moving to the DuMont network for a run from April to October. The series was originally intended to run for six months on DuMont, but, due to financial difficulties, the network was unable to fulfill the $5 million contract, despite Nielsen ratings estimated at ten million viewers. The DuMont shows were aired live.

A final version, aired in syndication, was filmed in 1955 and aired on local stations until 1956. This version moved the Goldbergs from the Bronx to the New York suburb of Haverville. In a way this mirrored the real life journey of many Jewish families from the Bronx to the suburbs and other parts of New York during this period. However, this was considered the death knell of the show, as it was felt that the Goldbergs were only the Goldbergs in the Bronx. Also in 1955, Philip Loeb, beset by depression and unable to find other work, committed suicide. In 1957, Gertrude Berg made her last two appearances as Molly Goldberg: first on an episode of the NBC-TV variety series Washington Square with Ray Bolger, and then on a Kate Smith special that aired on ABC-TV.

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Up In Smoke…Johnny gets tangled in a joke


The Great Carsoni, Up In Smoke

Johnny gets tangled in a joke, but the boom operator’s attempt to help only digs the hole deeper. At the end, Johnny goes up on the boom for a “chat”.

Johnny tries to get through a joke with a little help from his staff. Visit http://www.facebook.com/OfficialJohnnyCarson to like “The Tonight Show Starring J…

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BBC Television Center Tribute


BBC Television Center

Here’s an hour and forty minutes of memories and great footage. Very well done and many Marconi and EMI camera shots along the way.

Documentary which recalls the heyday of one of Britain’s most iconic buildings, BBC Television Centre, through the memories of stars and staff. A rich variet…

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‘Kiss Me Kate’, NBC November 20, 1958

‘Kiss Me Kate’, NBC November 20, 1958

This production of the Cole Porter musical was done for The Hallmark Hall Of Fame. The cardboard viewfinder shades on the TK41s tell us this was done at NBC Brooklyn Studios.

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Hail To The Chief…And The ‘Sheriff’

Hail To The Chief…And The ‘Sheriff’

Below, yours truly with Rob Lowe in the Oval Office. In a break between scenes, I got a chance to meet Rob and after a couple of minutes conversation, I told him I play the Sheriff on ‘Squidbillies’. He instantly lit up, laughed and said “I thought you sounded familiar”. Seems he and his sons, 17 and 20 all watch the show and have since his boys turned him on to it a few years back. From just the part’s I’ve seen, he makes a very believable JFK. I thought he was great in ‘West Wing’ and all of the Mike Meyers ‘Austin Powers’ movies and ‘Wayne’s World’.

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My Cameras On The Set of “Killing Kennedy”

Be Here Tomorrow! I Just Got Back…

I’m very tired, but wanted you to know I’ll have some great pictures in the morning of ‘The Killing Of Kennedy’ docudrama that I, and these 3 cameras were a part of this morning at New Millennium Studios in Richmond VA.

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PHOTO: Rob Lowe Looks Just Like President Kennedy

‘Killing Kennedy’

Tomorrow morning, I’m off to Richmond for a few days with a couple of cameras for the filming of ‘Killing Kennedy’. I’ll be taking an RCA TK30, a TK10 and an Arriflex 16mm camera for the recreation of the Cuban Missile Crisis speech from the Oval Office. Ridley Scott is the producer and this docudrama will air on The National Geographic Channel in November. Rob Lowe stars as JFK and this is based on the new book from Bill O’Riley. The decision to produce the film follows the success of the same network’s release of Killing Lincoln, a movie about President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, which broke ratings records for the network.

http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20708741,00.html

PHOTO: Rob Lowe Looks Just Like President Kennedy

The actor plays the assassinated president in National Geographic Channel’s Killing Kennedy

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