Posts in Category: Broadcast History

’30 Rock’ Set: Silvercup Studios

30 Rock Set: Silvercup Studios

This is the studio set that stands in for NBC’s Studio 8H, home of ‘Saturday Night Live’. The main lot is at 4222 22nd Street in Long Island City. Other shows taping there are ‘White Collar’ and ‘Person Of Interest’. To see more, click the link. http://www.silvercupstudios.com/

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Paul Lynde! 50 Zingers here! Enjoy!

The One And Only…Paul Lynde!
50 Zingers here! Enjoy!

Peter Marshall: Will a goose help warn you if there’s an intruder on your property?
Paul Lynde: There’s no better way!

Peter Marshall: In “Alice in Wonderland”, who kept crying “I’m late, I’m late?”
Paul Lynde: Alice, and her mother is sick about it.

Peter Marshall: According to Tony Randall, “Every woman I’ve been intimate with in my life has been…” What?
Paul Lynde: Bitterly disappointed.

Peter Marshall: Diamonds should not be kept with your family jewels, why?
Paul Lynde: They’re so cold!

Peter Marshall: What is a pullet?
Paul Lynde: A little show of affection…

Peter Marshall: Paul, Snow White…was she a blonde or a brunette?
Paul Lynde: Only Walt Disney knows for sure…

Peter Marshall: Promethius was tied to the top of a mountain by the gods because he had given something to man. What did he give us?
Paul Lynde: I don’t know what you got, but I got a sports shirt.

Peter Marshall: When Richard Nixon was Vice-President, he went someplace on a “good will mission,” but instead wound up being stoned and shouted at. Where did this take place?
Paul Lynde: Pat’s room .

Peter Marshall: True or false, cow’s horns are used to make ice cream.
Paul Lynde: You mean those weren’t chocolate chips?

Peter Marshall: What are “dual purpose”cattle good for that other cattle aren’t?
Paul Lynde: They give milk and cookies…but I don’t recommend the cookies!

Peter Marshall: Paul, why do Hell’s Angels wear leather?
Paul Lynde: Because chiffon wrinkles too easily.

Peter Marshall: True or false…research indicates that Columbus liked to wear bloomers and long stockings.
Paul Lynde: It’s not easy to sign a crew up for six months…

Peter Marshall: Whose motto is “Do Your Best”?
Paul Lynde: I guess we can rule out Jimmy Carter…

Peter Marshall: According to the French Chef, Julia Child, how much is a pinch?
Paul Lynde: Just enough to turn her on…

Peter Marshall: It is considered in bad taste to discuss two subjects at nudist camps. One is politics. What is the other?
Paul Lynde: Tape measures.

Peter Marshall: True or false, the navy has trained whales to recover objects a mile deep.
Paul Lynde: At first they tried unsuccessfully with cocker spaniels…

Peter Marshall: It used to be called “9-pin.” What’s it called today?
Paul Lynde: Foreplay!

Peter Marshall: When you pat a dog on its head he will usually wag his tail. What will a goose do?
Paul Lynde: Make him bark.

Peter Marshall: Paul, in the early days of Hollywood, who was usually found atop Tony, the Wonder Horse?
Paul Lynde: My Friend Flicka.

Peter Marshall: During the War of 1812, Captain Oliver Perry made the famous statement, “We have met the enemy and…” What?
Paul Lynde: They are cute.

Peter Marshall: Burt Reynolds is quoted as saying, “Dinah (Shore)’s in top form. I’ve never known anyone to be so completely able to throw herself into a…” A what?
Paul Lynde: A headboard.

Peter Marshall: What is the name of the instrument with the light on the end, that the doctor sticks in your ear?
Paul Lynde: Oh, a cigarette.

Peter Marshall: In one state, you can deduct $5 from a traffic ticket if you show the officer…what?
Paul Lynde: A ten dollar bill.

Peter Marshall: Experts say you should avoid sex immediately after…what?
Paul Lynde: Surgery.

Peter Marshall: True or false, each generation of Americans has been about an inch taller than the previous generation…
Paul Lynde: That makes Robert Conrad an antique!

Peter Marshall: It’s well known that small amounts of female hormones are found in the male body. Are male hormones ever found in the female body?
Paul Lynde: Occasionally.

Peter Marshall: In the “Wizard of Oz,” the lion wanted courage and the tin man wanted a heart. What did the scarecrow want?
Paul Lynde: He wanted the tin man to notice him.

Peter Marshall: Billy Graham recently called it “our great hope in a confusing and ever-changing world.” What is it?
Paul Lynde: Pampers.

Peter Marshall: Paul, how many men are on a hockey team?
Paul Lynde: Oh, about half.

Peter Marshall: What should you do if you’re going 55 miles per hour and your tires suddenly blow out?
Paul Lynde: Honk if you believe in Jesus.

Peter Marshall: What do you call a man who gives you diamonds and pearls?
Paul Lynde: I’d call him “darling”!

Peter Marshall: True or false…a shipment of the Pill was recently recalled because they were actually sugar pills…
Paul Lynde: Does this mean all of the babies born in November will have pimples?

Peter Marshall: We’ve all heard the old phrase “A pig in a poke.” What is a poke?
Paul Lynde: It’s when you’re not really in love.

Peter Marshall: Paul, this is for 12 hundred dollars and the championship. Dale Evans recently revealed the three secrets behind her happy marriage with Roy Rogers. Now listen carefully…”We work together, we pray together and we’re darn good…” What?
Paul Lynde: In the saddle.

Peter Marshall: Paul, in what famous book will you read about a talking ass who wonders why it’s being beaten?
Paul Lynde: I read it, “The Joy of Sex.”

Peter Marshall: Is it normal for Norwegians to talk to trees?
Paul Lynde: As long as that’s as far as it goes.

Peter Marshall: Paul, can anything bring tears to a chimp’s eyes?
Paul Lynde: Finding out that Tarzan swings both ways!

Peter Marshall: Is it possible for the puppies in a litter to have more than one daddy?
Paul Lynde: Why, that bitch!

Peter Marshall: Fred Astaire says, his mother has been trying to get him to do this since he was 35. But he hasn’t done it and says he won’t do it until he’s ready. Do what?
Paul Lynde: Move out of the house!

Peter Marshall: It is the most abused and neglected part of your body– what is it?
Paul Lynde: Mine may be abused but it certainly isn’t neglected!

Peter Marshall: According to the old song, what’s breaking up that old gang of mine?
Paul Lynde: Anita Byant!

Peter Marshall: Paul, the Rio Grande River seperates Texas and Mexico. What does “Rio Grande” mean in Spanish?
Paul Lynde: El Washing Machine.

Peter Marshall: Paul,Zsa Zsa Gabor says she never ever swims with her face in the water. Why?
Paul Lynde: It clogs the drain.

Peter Marshall: Paul, Broderick Crawford says that he is often mistaken for….
Paul Lynde: A dump truck.

Peter Marshall: A current movie is being described as “the story of a love that changed the world forever.” What movie is it?
Paul Lynde: Oh, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

Peter Marshall: Lana Turner recently said, “I won’t do it because I haven’t stopped living my life by a long shot.” What won’t she do?
Paul Lynde: Oh, the Merv Griffin show.

Peter Marshall: Now listen carefully, Paul. If you have one it’s a moose. If you have two, it’s a….?
Paul Lynde: It’s a mess!

Peter Marshall: In the Bible, who was found in a basket among the bulrushes?
Paul Lynde: Colonel Sanders.

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If Only This Set Could Talk!

If Only This Set Could Talk! Can you imagine the stories?

The Celebrity Game inspired Merrill Heatter to work overtime trying to develop another multi-celebrity game. One Sunday afternoon he suddenly hit on an idea…put the celebrities in a giant tic-tac-toe board. He brought in partner Bob Quigley and the two pitched the idea to CBS daytime chief Fred Silverman, who ordered a pilot. So, with Bert Parks emceeing in 1965, the two taped a pilot called The Hollywood Squares.

Silverman had a slot to fill and a choice to make between Squares and The Face is Familiar. He chose Face (anyone remember that one?). When the option expired Heatter and Quigley shopped the show to ABC and NBC and were turned down cold. But NBC at least agreed to take a second look, and bought it. Their only complaint was that they didn’t like host Bert Parks, so they searched for another host. Supposedly, someone saw a Kellogg’s ad featuring comedian and song-and-dance man Peter Marshall …and the rest was history.

The Hollywood Squares premiered on NBC on October 17, 1966, at 11:30 a.m. EST, opposite The Dating Game on ABC and reruns of The Dick Van Dyke Show on CBS. Ironicly, Van Dyke costars Morey Amsterdam and Rose Marie were guests on that first show, and in fact were regulars for years. Three more of those first squares–Abby Dalton, Wally Cox and Charley Weaver– were also regulars during the show’s first few years. The Hollywood Squares would hold onto that time slot for ten years; ABC would move The Dating Game to another time within a year.

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The Piccolo Crane…Ever see one of these?

The Piccolo Crane

Ever see one of these? This actually folds up on top of the wheel dolly and can hold 2 seated people and a camera. The link takes you to short video on how to set it up and if you don’t know anything at all about cranes, this is a good, little, easy lesson.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=GKPlZewPJ3s

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ESPN 3D Sideline Cart, View A

ESPN 3D Sideline Cart, View A

This is a modified Chapman Olympian base with 2 camera platforms. The lower one for the ‘human’ operator is a swivel turret that can go up about 20 feet. On the rear is an extendable boom arm that can go up another 20 feet above the operator when fully extended and has a robotic 3D camera on top. State of the art!

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ESPN 3D Sideline Cart, View B

ESPN 3D Sideline Cart, View B

This is a modified Chapman Olympian base with 2 camera platforms. The lower one for the ‘human’ operator is a swivel turret that can go up about 20 feet. On the rear is an extendable boom arm that can go up another 20 feet above the operator when fully extended and has a robotic 3D camera on top. State of the art!

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Heavy Metal The Illustrious Houston Fearless 30B Stage Crane.

Heavy Metal!

Here is the illustrious Houston Fearless 30B Stage Crane. This one at Radio Canada is carrying an RCA TK42 and is a Deluxe model. Most did not have the boom arm operator platform like this one. I could be wrong, but I think the 30B could crab, as well as be steered from either the front wheels or the back wheels. I think this had battery powered assist on steering, but I think it could also done manually. Fully loaded with this camera and the lead counter weights, this weighs well over 2000 pounds, but the movement is silky smooth! This was the best ride in the business.

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In Remembrance of Jim Henson

In Remembrance of Jim Henson

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No Studio Crane? Try This!

August 13, 1950: Hayloft Hoedown

Brand new in March of 1950, here’s real ingenuity at work at WHAS in Louisville, Kentucky. These Dumont 124s are shooting a Saturday night country music show and to get the great high shots without a crane, rolling scaffolding is pretty good alternative. Thanks to Craig Harper for the photo.

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Where the Sid Caesar/Imogene Coca Magic Started

Where the Sid Caesar/Imogene Coca Magic Started

The Admiral Broadway Revue is the only show known to be canceled because it was too successful…really! Admiral could not keep up with the demand for their TV sets so faced with the prospect of building a new plant or canceling the show, they canceled.

This was ground zero of what would later become the hugely successful, ‘Your Show Of Shows’. Admiral Broadway Review premiered on 28 January 1949, and was broadcast live simultaneously on both NBC and the now-defunct DuMont network. The show was telecast from the now-demolished International Theatre (also known as the Park Theatre) at 5 Columbus Circle in New York. The hour-long series was directed by Max Liebman, hosted by Sid Caesar, and also starred Imogene Coca. The last show of Admiral Broadway Revue was on June 3, 1949.

The series, oddly enough, was sponsored by TV set manufacturer Admiral, a company which was in direct competition with RCA (the parent company of NBC) and DuMont, which both manufactured TV sets. To see an episode, click the link.

http://archive.org/details/AdmiralBroadwayRevue

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“I’ve Got A Secret:..Philo T. Farnswroth, 1957


I’ve Got A Secret: Philo T. Farnswroth, 1957

Philo T. Farnsworth: The Boy Who Invented Television. http://farnovision.com Get the whole amazing story: http://farnovision.com/book.html Thumbnail sketch: …

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Today is Philo T. Farnsworth Day!

Today is Philo T. Farnsworth Day!

Below, you’ll see a lot of historical photos in this salute to the father of electronic television. I hope you’ll enjoy them, but most of all, I hope you’ll remember his determination to do what no one had done before. Although this true pioneer did get a lot of “arrows in his back”, he kept on and eventually won the battle with Goliath…RCA. Thank you Philo and thanks to your wife Pem for sticking with you through the rough spots. This is a photo from the 1936 studio in Philadelphia. Enjoy!

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Philo Farnsworth, Box Camera, Model 1

Philo Farnsworth, Box Camera, Model 1

This is the great granddaddy of all electronic television cameras! This is thought to be the first one Philo built and the date would be around 1926. I think the Smithsonian has this but I’m not sure. Anyone know?

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Philo Farnsworth, Box Camera, Model 2

Philo Farnsworth, Box Camera, Model 2

Farnsworth associate, Cliff Gardner is shown here with the second ever electronic television camera. The lens is on the left side of the box and you can see the opening of the recessed lens. This was probably taken in 1930.

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Philo Farnsworth, Mountable Camera 1

Philo Farnsworth, Mountable Camera 1

This is Philo’s first camera capable of being mounted on a tripod. With an old, still camera as a model, we’ve graduated from wooden boxes to a more manageable style. This is probably from 1931.

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Philo Farnsworth, Mountable Camera 2

Philo Farnsworth, Mountable Camera 2

This is perhaps from around 1934, and is Philo’s second camera that could be mounted on a tripod. Notice now the camera has a gun site style viewfinder and a hard body, having left behind the adjustable, accordion focus lens. This is Philo with the camera.

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Farnsworth Camera, Image 1

Farnsworth Camera, Image 1

Philo Farnsworth had built two or three cameras before this mid 1930s model, but all of the earlier cameras were either modeled after accordion lensed still cameras or box size table units. This is his first go at a commercial model. Operating the new camera is his associate, Don Pike and behind him is what could be the first version of this camera without the chrome striping.

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Farnsworth Camera, Image 2

Farnsworth Camera, Image 2

This is the mid 1930’s camera with it’s cover off.

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The Man Who Filmed ‘I Love Lucy’, Tells Us How It Was Done.

The Man Who Filmed ‘I Love Lucy’, Tells Us How It Was Done.

By: KARL FREUND, Director of Photography

The Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz show was a challenge from the start. It was decided that, for the first time, TV cameras would be replaced with three motion picture cameras to allow more flexibility in editing and to improve the photographic quality over kinescope recording.

This, I felt, was a legitimate approach to the situation. I expected very little variation from the ritual of photographing regular motion pictures — but I had not taken into consideration the unique problems involved. I was soon to be faced with them.

First of all, a live show requires an audience. This necessitated a regular studio sound stage equipped with bleachers to hold some 300 people. Above the stage a series of directional microphones and loud speakers had to be installed.

To give the audience a clear view of the program, and to allow the cameras total mobility without interference from floor cables, the lights for the sets had to be placed above the stage.

It became obvious almost at once that the overhead light placement was hardly flattering to the photographing of the performers. While the print value seemed up to par when projected in a studio projection room, they showed too much contrast when viewed over a closed TV circuit. Thus, we were faced with the fact that the greatest difference between standard motion pictures technique and TV films is the subject lighting contrast, which is required.

The immediate question was what method we should use to obtain the desired compression in the positive print. The solution was fairly simple. After careful survey, we selected a method that would involve no departure from standard practice in processing laboratory operations. That is, in exposing the original negative, use a subject lighting contrast considerable lower than that normally used for conventional black and white motion picture photography and process both the negative and print in the normal way.

It requires four days to line up each weekly show of “I Love Lucy” and “Our Miss Brooks.” Two of these days are for rehearsals. At the end of the second day the cameraman sees a run-through during which he can make notes and sketches of positions to be covered by the cameras and instructs the electrical crew as to where lights are to be placed. The last two days are occupied by rehearsals with cameras.

Since a show with audience participation must go on at a specified time, this schedule must be religiously adhered to by everyone concerned, including the cast. An hour and a half is the actual shooting time.

To film each show we use three BNC Mitchell cameras with T-stop calibrated lenses on dollies. The middle camera usually covers the long shot using 28mm. to 50mm. lenses. The two close-up cameras, 75 to 90 degrees apart from the center camera, are equipped with 3″ to 4″ lenses, depending on the requirements for coverage.

The only floor lights used are mounted on the bottom of each camera dolly and above each lens. They are controlled by dimmers.

There is a crew of four men to each camera: the cameraman, his assistant, a “grip” and a “cable man.” Unlike TV, where one man generally handles the camera movements and views the results immediately, this technique requires absolute coordination between members of the crew.

Every movement of each dolly is marked on the floor for every scene. And since all the movements of the camera are cued from the monitor box, the entire crew works from an intercom system.
As for myself, I utilize a two-circuit intercom. This allows me to talk separately to the monitor booth and the camera crew on one; the electricians handling the dimmers and the switchboard on the other.

Retakes, a standard procedure on the Hollywood scene, are not desirable in making TV films with audience participation. Dubbed-in laughs are artificial and, consequently, used only in emergencies. Close-ups, another routine step in standard film-making, were discarded since such glamour treatment stood out like a sore thumb.

Thanks to http://www.lucyfan.com/freundfilming.html for this information. Great site for Lucy fans.

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Guess What This Door Used To Be…

Guess What This Door Used To Be…

Here’s a clue: in the 50s, people lined up here to see the most famous of all television shows.

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THIS Is A REAL News Team!

THIS Is A REAL News Team!

With election night just weeks away, take a look at the CBS team covering the 1964 election. The race was between Johnson and Goldwater and at the Broadcast Center, CBS was ready. L-R, Harry Reasoner, Roger Mudd, Eric Severeid, Mike Wallace, Robert Trout and Walter Cronkite. Unfortunately, they don’t make ’em like they used to!

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1954, Television In The Army


Now THIS is INTERESTING!

This is a 1954 production by the US Army on their use of Television in the military. There are a lot of different kinds of equipment shown here from RCA, Dumont, Dage more. Some of it is ‘pure army’, but that’s why there’s fast forward, right? Enjoy and let us know what you think. A lens I’ve never seen shows up at 22:27…anyone know what that is? Thanks to David Crosthwait for the link.

National Archives and Records Administration ARC Identifier 2569535 / Local Identifier 111-TV-265 Big Picture: TV in the Army Department of Defense. Departme…

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Some Interesting Production Notes On ‘The Birds’ from Alfred Hirchcock

Just for fun, here are some interesting production notes on ‘The Birds’ from Alfred Hitchcok who’s shown here with the stars…the birds. Also shown, Tippi Hedren, Rod Taylor, Jesica Tandy and Veronica Cartwright.

To keep the birds from flying around and on the ground, they were fed a heavy grain and whiskey mix.

The use of standard blue screen techniques for doing matte shots of the birds proved to be unacceptable. The rapid movement of the birds, especially their wings, caused excessive blue fringing in the shots. It was determined that the sodium vapor process could be used to do the composites. The only studio in America that was equipped for this process was the Walt Disney studio. Ub Iwerks, who had become the world’s leading expert on the sodium vapor process, was assigned to this production.

In the scene where Tippi Hedren is running and continually attacked, the birds were actually attached to her coat with nylon thread and were flapping to get loose. Very convincing.

There was no musical score for the film except for the sounds created on the Mixtrautonium, an early electronic musical instrument similar to a Moog.

To make the sound of the birds attacks more frighting, reel to reel tapes of the angry birds was played backward in the mix.

Finally, one ending never shot was a scene showing the Golden Gate bridge covered with birds. That would have been powerful!

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Eva Marie Saint…First TV Job, NBC Page

Eva Marie Saint: Campus Hoopla

In her fist television job, Eva was a page at NBC. Later she appeared in the 1946-47 show, ‘Campus Hoopla’ on NBC and this is a shot from that set shot for Life Magazine. She went on the movies and won an Oscar for On The Waterfront and appeared in a lot of great movies like North By Northwest, Exodus, The Sandpiper and even played Martha Kent in Superman Returns. Speaking of returns, she returned to TV for roles in Moonlighting and Taxi.

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BRAVO! A RESURRECTION!

BRAVO! A RESURRECTION!

Congratulations to the CBC! A vintage, Vinten Heron Crane, which was introduced in 1955 is alive and well Montreal. This picture was taken last Sunday, October 16 on the set of a new variety show call “Un Air De Famille” in CBC studio 42. I am sure the gang at Vinten will be proud to see their old crane will still at work in 2012 with a Sony HD 1000 camera on it ! Many Thanks to Sylvain Pichette for the photo and update. I’m sending this to Vinten now.

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50 Years Ago: The Edge Of Nuclear War!

50 Years Ago: The Edge Of Nuclear War!

October 15 through October 27, 1962 the world passed 13 tension filled days not knowing if we would live or die in a fireball. This astounding photo, and others are from a great pictorial in The Atlantic Magazine on The Cuban Missile Crisis. This was the scene in the Oval Office on the 22nd when President Kennedy addressed the nation on the seriousness of the situation in Cuba. Thanks to Walt Palmer.
http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2012/10/50-years-ago-the-cuban-missile-crisis/100387/

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The Rank-Taylor-Hobson Zoom Lens

The Rank-Taylor-Hobson Zoom Lens

By far, this was the most popular zoom for RCA TK41s and TK60s. The Zoomar was also very popular, but that was seen mostly on black and white cameras in use prior to the mid 60’s introduction of this lens. This is often refereed to as the Varotal III and Varotal V. The Mark V model is for studio use and the Mark III for outside.

Varotal Lenses (From the RCA Product Catalog)

The Studio Varotal V and Outdoor Varotal III are variable focal length lenses designed to cover the full range of focal lengths normally used for television programming. By eliminating the need to switch to a second camera for change of lens turret position, the Varotals provide means of producing a variation of close-u p and distance “shots” with only one camera. The lenses enable observation of detailed processes without the loss of continuity entailed in changing lenses. In addition, dramatic effects may be obtained by “zooming” from a distance shot to a close-up of one portion of the scene, or from a close-up view to a distance shot.

Outdoor Varotal III

The Outdoor Varotal III Lens has been designed for versatile use in studios or on remotes. It features a unique dual range change from 4 to 20 inches and from 8 to 40 inches by means of a small lever on the lens without change of rear element or loss of picture focus. High quality definition is achieved and the lens is fully color corrected and designed for use on both color or monochrome cameras. Minimum object distance for which the entire zoom range is available is twelve feet, and a close-up adaptor is available for reducing the minimum object distance to six feet.

The zoom and focus controls for the Varotal III are combined in a lever mechanism which mounts on a bracket attached to’ the rear of the camera. The controls are mechanically coupled to’ the lens by means of a pair of flexible cables and a precision gearbox which is mounted on the lens. Zoom control is provided by rotation of the lever.

Focus control is provided by rotation of a knob mounted an the zoom control lever. The direction of rotation of the focus knob, with respect to focusing action, corresponds to that of the regular camera focus knob, for ease and familiarity of operation.

An adjustable friction brake is provided to vary the amount of pressure required to operate the zoom control in accordance with individual operator preference. This brake may also be used to lock the zoom control at any desired point within the zoom range.

Varotal V

The Varotal V is a new Zoom lens with a focal length range of 1.6 to 16 inches and a relative aperture of f/4.0 to f/22.0 throughout the zoom range. The focal length and optical speed of this lens make it suitable for both studio and outside broadcast use. The linear iris mechanism conforms to all requirements for adjustment by an iris motor drive system or manual operation.

The separate zoom and focus control of the lens are mechanically coupled to the lens by two separate flexible cables. The zoom mechanism is mounted on a bracket at the right rear of the camera, and a lever on this control adjusts the focal length of the lens. A knob is attached to this lever for adjustment of zoom friction and may be used to lock the iris at any point within the zoom range.

The zoom mechanism is a dual speed device which has two output couplings permitting a choice of zoom speeds by attaching the control cable to the desired output coupling. The focus control handle is attached to the camera pan and tilt head handle at left rear of the camera and is coupled to’ the lens by a flexible cable. The Varotal V lens requires a field lens when used on a TK4I Color Camera.

Three range extenders and a close-up adaptor are available as accessories for the Varotal V. The extenders change the range of the basic lens to 2.4 to 24 inches, f/6.0; 3.2 to 32 inches, f/8.0; and 4.8 to 48 inches, f/12.0. The close-up adaptor has a minimum object distance of three feet.

The Varotal III and V are mounted on the RCA TK-11, 31 and TK-l4 monochrome TV Cameras by means of a special mounting plate which is readily installed in place of the standard camera turret. Either lens may be mounted directly on the TK-60 camera turret. Control cables and a suitable mounting bracket for the zoom and focus control mechanism are supplied with the lens. Ordering information should specify the type of RCA camera on which the lens is to be mounted.

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Angenieux Evershed Lens This is the ‘box zoom’ lens

Angenieux Evershed Lens

This is the ‘box zoom’ lens made by Angenieux but it was very rare to see one of these in the US. The Rank-Taylor-Hobson zoom lenses were more common here on RCA cameras, but occasionally you saw one, as on the WDAF camera in the photo just before this.

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Among The First!

Among The First!

These ladies are among the first to ever see themselves on Television. As part of the 1939 World’s Fair exhibition, RCA fed video and audio from this podium for most of the summer. The lines were long, and those ‘televised’ were given a certificate with the date and the place.

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Classic CBS! Dennis ‘Paddy’ McBride…From Sullivan & Gleason To Sports

Classic CBS

This is the late Dennis ‘Paddy’ McBride in command of a TK30. For many years, Dennis was one of the top cameramen for CBS. His specialty was sports and he won several Emmys for his work which included zoom lens techniques. Great photo.

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